The fish, "in two pieces," was placed before the captain; while Pitts stood by his side, ready to pass the plates, and hear any comments the captain might make on the principal viand. The odor from the steaming fish was emphatically agreeable to the hungry hunters, and so was the soft divan to their tired legs.

"Not since she's come back from abroad," Jimmie muttered without looking at her. "Eleanor's taken the job over now," Peter said. "She's made him swear off red ink and red neckties." "Any color so long's it's red is the color that suits me best," Jimmie quoted. "Lord, isn't this room a pippin?" He swam in among the bright pillows of the divan and so hid his face for a moment.

Having ended interrogating, recording, and cursing out with obscenities the throng of ragamuffins, taken in during the night for sobering up and now being sent out over their own districts, he threw himself against the back of the divan, put his hands behind his neck, and stretched with all his enormous, heroic body so hard that all his ligaments and joints cracked.

His forehead was moist; his lips dry; his delicate nostrils were indrawn in harmony with the concentrating lines of his brow, and the next moment, as if in response to an insinuating pass of the merchant's hand of cobra-like undulation, the rigid poise recoiled, he settled more easily upon the divan, and with eyes still fascinated by the entrancing bauble he listened, with anomalous impassiveness, to the weird proposal of Ram Lal.

I only wish to look well for your sake. I have no vanity why should I have? It's only my desire to be presentable on your account." Her blue orbs suffused with tears. Dorothy leaped from the divan, to the imminent danger of the breakfast tray. "Now, Aunt Lydia, don't be foolish. I didn't mean to hurt your feelings, and, besides, you know you are the really, truly belle of the ball.

Beneath, reclining on a divan, slowly fanned by a dozen gaudily-attired negroes, was a dark-faced, full-bearded man of middle age, whose black eyes regarded us keenly as we entered. He was dressed in a robe of bright yellow silk, and in his turban there glittered a single diamond that sparkled and gleamed with a thousand iridescent rays.

"You never have been guilty of stupidity, Marston." "Because I've managed never to be a fool about you however much I have been tempted to become one." "Have been, Marston?" she inflected. "Have been and am," he bowed. "I'm not different from the rest only " She curled herself on a divan, and languidly stretched her slender rounded arms behind the raven hair. "Only what, Marston?" she murmured.

Leonore listened to the air which the musicians were beginning, and finding it the Lancers, or dreariest of dances, she made Peter happy by assenting. "Suppose we go out on the veranda," said Peter, still quoting. "Now of what are you going to talk?" said Leonore, when they were ensconced on a big wicker divan, in the soft half light of the Chinese lanterns.

If you believe in me even to some extent, tell me, my darling, tell me, is that so or not?" She turned red, covered her face with her hands, fell down on the divan and burst into tears. "My dearie! Vassil Vassilich! Vasinka! Honest to God! Honest to God, now, there never was anything of the kind! I always was so careful! I was awfully afraid of this. I love you so!

"Flix called my attention to the fall some time ago; and after a look at the chart I decided to alter the course," said the captain, as he pointed out the island of Cyprus on the chart spread out on the falling table over the divan. "I have no doubt you have done the right thing at the right time, as you always do in the matter of navigation."