I bade farewell to my three excellent friends, promising to return within two years. I left my brother Francois in the studio of Simonetti, the painter of battle pieces, known as the Parmesan. I gave him a promise to think of him in Paris, where, at that time particularly, great talent was always certain of a high fortune. My readers will see how I kept my word.

About a fortnight before the murder this sort of partnership was dissolved at the proposal of Simonetti, and some days after Avanzi made a claim on his late partner for the price of two pounds of hemp not accounted for.

An hour and a half after, while Avanzi was sitting at his frame, with his face to the wall, Simonetti entered the room with an axe he had picked up in the carpenter's store, and walking deliberately up to Avanzi, struck him with the axe across the neck, as he was stooping down. Almost immediate death ensued, and on the arrival of the guard, Simonetti was arrested at once, and placed in irons.

I bade farewell to my three excellent friends, promising to return within two years. I left my brother Francois in the studio of Simonetti, the painter of battle pieces, known as the Parmesan. I gave him a promise to think of him in Paris, where, at that time particularly, great talent was always certain of a high fortune. My readers will see how I kept my word.

Morris asked, and Enrico Simonetti heaved a great sigh. "I like-a da job first-class, Mr. Perlmutter, I gotta no keek," he declared; "but I can no work. I am seek." "Sick!" Morris exclaimed; "well, why didn't you tell us then? We'd only be too glad to let you go away for a couple of weeks, Henry." Enrico sighed even more deeply. "Ees not a seekness for two weeks, Mr. Perlmutter," he said.

"Ain't you signed the contract yet?" Morris cried. "Not-a yet," Simonetti answered. "Just-a now I am going." "Baskof," Morris urged, "supposing you and me goes together with Mr. Simonetti to the Harlem Winter Garden and talks the thing over." Simonetti looked amazedly at Baskof. "Sure," Baskof said. "It ain't too late if he ain't signed the contract." "What do you mean?" Simonetti asked.

To give you an opportunity of exerting your talents, I send you, here inclosed, a letter of recommendation from Monsieur Villettes to Madame de Simonetti at Milan; a woman of the first fashion and consideration there; and I shall in my next send you another from the same person to Madame Clerici, at the same place.

And mind you, Mawruss, the feller is otherwise perfectly decent, respectable feller by the name Enrico Simonetti." Morris nodded. "With a name like that he must got to be a good designer," he commented, "otherwise Sammet Brothers wouldn't hire him at all. It would take a whole lot more gumption than Leon Sammet got it to call such a feller from the cutting room even." "That's all right, Mawruss.

"This agreement," it ran, "made and entered into between Abraham Potash and Morris Perlmutter, composing the firm of Potash & Perlmutter, of the Borough of Manhattan, City of New York, parties of the first part, and Enrico Simonetti, of the same place, party of the second part, witnesseth " At this point Abe dropped the contract.

Simonetti looked earnestly at Morris, who fumbled in his waistcoat pocket and produced a cigar. "Do you smoke, Mr. Simmons?" he began. "Simonetti," the designer interrupted, as he took the cigar and bit off the end; "and eef ees too much-a you say Simonetti, call me 'Enery."