Ambroise Pare had by this time examined the king's head; he thought the moment propitious for his operation; if it was not performed suffusion would take place, and Francois II. might die at any moment.

At the end of the dinner, which was gloomy enough, Queen Mary had the cruel boldness to turn the conversation openly upon the trial of the noblemen on the charge of being seized with arms in their hands, and to speak of the necessity of making a great public show of their execution. "Madame," said Francois II., "is it not enough for the king of France to know that so much brave blood is to flow?

"I tell you, no," replied Basil. "It is not nonsense it can be done I have often heard so from the trappers, now let us try it ourselves." "Agreed, then," said Francois and Lucien at once; and all three rode forward together. When they had got near enough to distinguish the forms of the birds, they saw they were two old "gobblers" and a hen.

The breeze now increased, and the stranger in the offing approached. "Hurrah!" cried Paul Pringle, "another broadside, lads, and the Monsieurs will haul down their flag." Paul's assertion proved correct. Down came the Frenchman's colours, after an action which lasted two hours and ten minutes. She proved to be the thirty-eight-gun frigate Reunion, Captain Francois Adenian.

Francois de Laville and Philip had fought by the side of La Noue, in the engagement in the streets of Orleans; but had seen little of the Count afterwards, his time being fully employed in completing the various arrangements to ensure the safety of the town.

Pierre and Francois found Antoine at the end of the gallery assigned to the Primitive masters. With scrupulous, almost devout care he was making a drawing of a figure by Mantegna.

Each in his way moved his lips in his accustomed prayer until the sound of the distant bell ceased. "Now, then, for your dirty blood!" roared Barbemouche, instantly resuming animation. But his fat comrade knocked aside Barbemouche's sword, and at the same time pushed Francois out of striking distance.

Their horses were probably not far away. "Ha!" laughed De Berquin, in answer to my words and movement. "So you don't share Barbemouche's own opinion of his beauty?" An unctuous guffaw from the fat rascal, and a grim chuckle from gaunt Francois, indicated that Barbemouche's ugliness was a favorite subject of mirth with his comrades.

Pierre was delighted to meet his nephew, for he had been greatly impressed in his favour on the occasion of his visit to Montmartre. Francois, on his side, greeted his uncle with all the cordial expansiveness of youth. He was, moreover, well pleased to obtain some news of his father. However, Bertheroy began.

Jean François Millet was born October 4, 1814, in the hamlet of Gruchy, a mere handful of houses which lie in a valley descending to the sea, in the department of the Manche, not far from Cherbourg. He was the descendant of a class which has no counterpart in England or America, and which in his native France has all but disappeared.