"I did a little work for him. Helped get the lion's cage straightened up. How about it are you going in on my pass?" "N-o-o," drawled Teddy. "Might get me into bad habits to go in on a pass. I'd rather sneak in under the tent when the boss isn't looking." Phil started for the Widow Cahill's on the run after having procured his tickets. "Here's a ticket for the circus, Mrs.

"N-o-o!" was heard a little while after in a thin and long-drawn-out cry from the sea; and again the horn was heard, a long, hoarse sound that came rocking in on the waves, and burst gurgling in the splash under the wharf and on the slips. The farmers were out of it all. They dozed a little or sat flicking their whips to pass the time. But every one else was in a state of suspense.

"You cannot recommend me a valet, Findlater," renewed his lordship, "a good, honest, sensible fellow, who can neither read nor write?" "N-o-o, that is to say, yes! I can; my old servant Collard is out of place, and is as ignorant as as " "I or you are?" said Lord St. George, with a laugh. "Precisely," replied the baronet.

"N-o-o," sighed Dorothy, poutingly, while she bent low her head and toyed with the gold lace of my cloak. "Farewell," said John. He took a step or two backward from her. "You are over-eager to leave, it seems to me," said the girl in an injured tone. "I wonder that you came at all." John's heart was singing hosanna. He, however, maintained his voice at a mournful pitch and said: "I must go.

Their story may in the main be perfectly true, but if by any chance they should have happened to recognise you it would not be very difficult for them to substitute the name of the Fernan Vaz for that of some other river, and to mention King Olomba instead of some other king." "N-o-o," said the skipper dubiously; "it would not.

"You cannot recommend me a valet, Findlater," renewed his lordship, "a good, honest, sensible fellow, who can neither read nor write?" "N-o-o, that is to say, yes! I can; my old servant Collard is out of place, and is as ignorant as as " "I or you are?" said Lord St. George, with a laugh. "Precisely," replied the baronet.

"Do you think we are in for a blizzard?" she asked when they were at the table. To her unspeakable relief, she found that the one cup was intended for her; he had waved her toward the one chair, apparently the place of honor, contenting himself with one of the stools. "N-o-o," he said, "I don't think so. It's beginning to lighten up a little already.

As if you weren't all I have to love in the world now poor father is is de-a-d," and she began to weep. "I did not love him as I ought to have done, Paul." "My own, he would not let you love him very much." "N-o-o," said Sylvia, drying her eyes on Paul's handkerchief, which he produced. "I don't know why. Sometimes he was nice, and sometimes he wasn't.

"Y-e-s," she responded, her head bent doubtingly to one side, as she glanced down at the ring. "You don't feel superstitious about it, do you?" he asked. "N-o-o." "Then we'll keep it, won't we?" "Y-e-s." He drew the girl toward him and she turned her face upward. He would have kissed her had he not been startled by a call from the opposite side of the river. "Here, here, stop that.

"N-o-o," reflected Phil slowly, "I thought I was a goner." "While the rest of our crowd were hiking for cover, like a lot of 'cold feet, you were diving right into the heart of the trouble, picking up my principal equestrienne. Then you sent her away and stopped to face the herd of bulls. Jumping giraffes, but it was a sight!"