"She mus' er gone up fru de chimbly, like Marse Santion Claws," said Agnes; and Diddie thought that was so funny that she giggled outright, and in a moment the wardrobe was opened and she was also taken prisoner. Then the four little captives were laid on their backs, and Polly scalped them with a clothes-brush for a tomahawk.

The girl returned and delivered her message. "What!" exclaimed the sick woman, in amazement. "He must have turned Radical sure enough, to send me such an answer as that! Maggie," she continued, with severe dignity, "you must be mistaken. Return and tell my son that I am sure you are mistaken." "Oh, dar ain't no mistake 'bout it, mistis. Dem's de berry words Marse Hesden said, shore."

"Marse Clarence done send 'em in, des picked out'n de hothouse dis afternoon, Miss Jinny. Jackson, fotch a bowl!" "No," said Virginia. She took the flowers from Ned, one by one, and to the wonderment of Captain Lige and her father strewed them hither and thither upon the table until the white cloth was hid by the red flowers. The Colonel stroked his goatee and nudged Captain Lige.

Goodwill's man, he's very thick long of Davy Hughs, Colonel Le Noir's coachman. And Davy he told Tom how one day last month his marse ordered the carriage, and went two or three days' journey up the country beyant Staunton, there he stayed a week and then came home, fetching along with him in the carriage this lovely young lady, who was dressed in the deepest mourning, and wept all the way.

"But, Marse, how is Miss Sybil, and where is she?" inquired the faithful servant, looking about himself. "She is very much prostrated by fatigue and excitement, and is now sleeping in the church." "Thanks be to the Divine Marster as she can sleep," said Joe, reverently.

As soon as the negro perceived that his master had opened his eyes he gave a cry of delight. "Tank de Lord, Marse Vincent; dis child tought you dead and gone for sure." "What's the matter, Dan? What has happened?" Vincent said, trying to move, and then stopping suddenly with a cry of pain. "You knocked off your horse, sah, wid one of de shells of dem cussed Yanks." "Am I badly hurt, Dan?"

Goodwin's man, he's very thick long of Davy Hughs, Colonel Le Noir's coachman. And Davy he told Tom how one day last month his marse ordered the carriage, and went two or three days' journey up the country beyant Staunton, there he stayed a week and then came home, fetching along with him in the carriage this lovely young lady, who was dressed in the deepest mourning, and wept all the way.

The sun rising over the forest often found us peeping through the blinds, and when he sank into the bay at night we were still running, tired but happy, and begging patient Hester for half an hour more. "Lawd, Marse Dick," I can hear her say, "you an' Miss Dolly's been on yo' feet since de dawn. And so's I, honey." And so we had.

Come to us at once, so that we may know what we have to expect." "Thank you kindly, sar," said Morris, taking off his hat. "I'll bear that in mind; but you see, Marse Marcy, I didn't want for to pester you and your maw. I was on the watch."

However, it's an ill wind that doesn't blow somebody good Marse Robert can come on back upstairs now an' thaw himself out while watchin' me read the Lamentations of Jeremiah who was evidently sufferin' from a dry spell himself."