Lemercier, De Breze, and the elder Rameau who, despite his peaceful habits and grey hairs, insisted on joining in the aid of la patrie were among the National Guards attached to the Fort de la Briche and the neighbouring eminence, and they met in conversation. "What a victory we have had!" said the old Rameau. "Rather mortifying to your son, M. Rameau," said LeMercier.

The Comtesse d'Houdetot was the daughter of the late M. de Bellegarde, a farmer-general, sister to M. d'Epinay, and Messieurs de Lalive and De la Briche, both of whom have since been introductors to ambassadors. I have spoken of the acquaintance I made with her before she was married: since that event I had not seen her, except at the fetes at La Chevrette, with Madam d'Epinay, her sister-in-law.

She made a sign to Paul Vence who was near her: "Do you not think Madame Martin is extraordinarily beautiful this year?" In the lobby, full of light and gold, General de La Briche asked Lariviere: "Did you see my nephew?" "Your nephew, Le Menil?" "Yes Robert. He was in the theatre a moment ago." La Briche remained pensive for a moment. Then he said: "He came this summer to Semanville.

Just as they had consigned him to the barracks for confinement, a post-office official arrived bringing a despatch from General Ambert. Learning that General Briche was a prisoner, the messenger carried his packet to the colonel of the 63rd Regiment, who was the next in seniority after the general. In opening it, it was found to contain the order of the day.

Madame Mauperin, delighted with Henriette's match, was anxious to find an equally suitable partner for Renée; but the high-spirited girl had a will of her own, and seemed to take almost a pleasure in crossing her mother's transparent matrimonial schemes. Quite a number of eligible young men had been introduced to the house at La Briche and had left it without having furthered their suit.

In a great portfolio belonging to the King there had been found a solitary letter from the Comte d'Artois, which, by its date, and the subjects of which it treated, indicated the existence of a continued correspondence. The man replied that M. Campan had died at La Briche in 1791, and that he had seen him interred in the cemetery of Epinay.

That night what crowds thronged from Paris to the top of the Montmartre heights, from the observatory on which the celebrated inventor Bazin had lighted up, with some magical electric machine, all the plain of Gennevilliers from Mont Valerien to the Fort de la Briche!

I thought him odd. A charming fellow, frank and intelligent. But he ought to have some occupation, some aim in life." The bell which announced the end of an intermission between the acts had hushed. In the foyer the two old men were walking alone. "An aim in life," repeated La Briche, tall, thin, and bent, while his companion, lightened and rejuvenated, hastened within, fearing to miss a scene.

She wanted him to do something for her. "Or, rather, for my nephew," she said. "He is a captain in the artillery, and his chiefs like him. His colonel was for a long time under orders of Monsieur Le Menil's uncle, General La Briche. If Monsieur Le Menil would ask his uncle to write to Colonel Faure in favor of my nephew I should be grateful to him. My nephew is not a stranger to Monsieur Le Menil.

She made a sign to Paul Vence who was near her: "Do you not think Madame Martin is extraordinarily beautiful this year?" In the lobby, full of light and gold, General de La Briche asked Lariviere: "Did you see my nephew?" "Your nephew, Le Menil?" "Yes Robert. He was in the theatre a moment ago." La Briche remained pensive for a moment. Then he said: "He came this summer to Semanville.