"The old woman hath touched it again," said the pedagogue; "REM ACU TETIGIT she hath pricked it with her needle's point. This Wayland takes no money, indeed; nor doth he show himself to any one." "And can this madman, for such I hold him," said the traveller, "know aught like good skill of his trade?"

But your Majesty's will can control the severity of this and every other law, and it is in your power, on consideration of his case, to grant the rash young man a free pardon." "Rem acu tetigisti, Carole, mi puerule," answered the king; "and know, my lords, that we have, by a shrewd device and gift of our own, already sounded the very depth of this Lord Glenvarloch's disposition.

"Be good children, Roland and Blanche both," said my mother, stopping from her work and holding up her needle threateningly, and indeed inflicting a slight puncture upon the Captain's shoulder. "'Rem acu tetigisti, my dear," said my father, borrowing Cicero's pun on the occasion. "And now we shall go upon velvet.

Bernard," said his wife, "on your own principles, they will be no loss, if they do vanish. If a superior race succeeds, all the better." "Right, right, my dear," cried her husband, "rem acu pshaw! I was going to quote Latin. They have had their day, and fulfilled their design." "It seems to me a deplorable necessity," said Mr. Armstrong.

Singularly enough too, while Roger devotes to the operation for the cure of hernia nearly half a page of his text, Gilbert dismisses the whole subject in a single sentence, as follows: Scindatur igitur totus exitus super hac cute exteriori cum carne fissa, et uatur y fac cum file serice et acu quadrata. He adds also: "Some doubt the propriety of using the term hernia for an inflation.

"Be good children, Roland and Blanche both," said my mother, stopping from her work and holding up her needle threateningly, and indeed inflicting a slight puncture upon the Captain's shoulder. "'Rem acu tetigisti, my dear," said my father, borrowing Cicero's pun on the occasion. "And now we shall go upon velvet.

"You are right, reverend sir," answered the courtier; "rem acu you have touched the point with a needle My cost and expenses had been indeed somewhat lavish at the late triumphs and tourneys, and the flat-capp'd citizens had shown themselves unwilling to furnish my pocket for new gallantries for the honour of the nation, as well as for mine own peculiar glory and, to speak truth, it was in some part the hope of seeing these matters amended that led me to desire a new world in England."

"Rem acu, once again," said Sir Piercie; and not without good cause, since my neck, if I remained, might have been brought within the circumstances of a halter and so speedy was my journey northward, that I had but time to exchange my peach-coloured doublet of Genoa velvet, thickly laid over with goldsmith's work, for this cuirass, which was made by Bonamico of Milan, and travelled northward with all speed, judging that I might do well to visit my Right Honourable Cousin of Northumberland, at one of his numerous castles.

All the land which lay to the west they called Ereb, which was their word for "sunset," or "west," and the land to the east they called Acu, which meant "sunrise," or "east;" and later, when men knew more about these lands, these names, changed a little, remained as the names of the great continents, Europe and Asia. Africa, too, is an old name, though not so old as these.

He wrote her that letter and she wrote back requesting him to look out for another young woman at his earliest convenience, because she wasn't his sort. She did, indeed! But she certainly was rather an unfortunate young woman, to be trothplight to such a very good and conscientious young man." "Rem tetigisti acu," said Adrian. "Never mind what that means.