"At least it's not another, he always had it, but he didn't call himself by it. Pardi, he's more than the Chevalier; he's the Comte Detricand de Tournay ah, then, believe me if you choose, there it is!" She pointed to the signature of the letter, and with a gush of eloquence explained how it all was about Detricand the vaurien and Detricand the Comte de Tournay.

"Didst thou see that vaurien Nicolas?" "Yes, I saw him." Marie blushed, and her mother burst out into angry words: "Foolish, trifling child that thou art! thou lovest that black-eyed gypsy boy; and for him, the idle vagabond, thou hast flung away the best parti in Aubette. Ciel! what do I say? In Bolbec itself there is no one with better prospects than Léon Roussel."

"Well, why not give the poor vaurien a chance to take up the mortgage?" "Why, he hasn't paid the interest in five years!" said Lavilette. "But ah you have had the use of the land, I think, monsieur. That should meet the interest." Lavilette scowled a little; Farcinelle grunted and laughed. "How can I give him a chance to pay the mortgage?" said Lavilette. "He never had a penny.

I should be really glad to take a lesson of these men and their plans for social improvement. 'You will have a fine opportunity this evening. Don't you dine at Minchampstead? 'Yes. Do you? 'Mr. Jingle dines everywhere, except at home. Will you take me over in your trap? 'Done. But whom shall we meet there? 'The Lavingtons, and Vieuxbois, and Vaurien, and a parson or two, I suppose.

"Ah, the poor, handsome vaurien!" the woman at the tavern kept saying to her husband all that day; and she could not rest till she had written to Virginie how Jean Jacques came to Shilah in the evening, and went with the dawn. The Young Doctor of Askatoon had a good heart, and he was exercising it honourably one winter's day near three years after Jean Jacques had left St. Saviour's.

No, she is not for Vanne Castine." Suddenly Shangois's manner changed; he laid his hand upon the other's shoulder. "My poor, wicked, good-for-nothing Vanne Castine, Christine Lavilette was not made for you. You are a poor vaurien, always a poor vaurien. I knew your father and your two grandfathers. They were all vauriens; all as handsome as you can think, and all died, not in their beds.

There is vaurien in her too," was the half- triumphant reply. "There is more woman," retorted Shangois; "much more." "We'll see about that, m'sieu'!" exclaimed Castine, as he turned towards the bear, which was clawing at his chain. An hour later, a scene quite as important occurred at Lavilette's great farmhouse. It was about ten o'clock. Lights were burning in every window.

"Yes, I shall be charmed to meet again a man who, whatever might be his errors in youth, on which," added Alain, slightly colouring, "it certainly does not become me to be severe, must have suffered the most poignant anguish a man of honour can undergo, namely, honour suspected; and who now, whether by years or sorrow, is so changed that I cannot recognize a likeness to the character I have just heard given to him as mauvais sujet and vaurien."

There is vaurien in her too," was the half-triumphant reply. "There is more woman," retorted Shangois; "much more." "We'll see about that, m'sieu'!" exclaimed Castine, as he turned towards the bear, which was clawing at his chain. An hour later, a scene quite as important occurred at Lavilette's great farmhouse. It was about ten o'clock. Lights were burning in every window.

The truth, please, or you get nothing more from me." "He is a vaurien and fainéant, and thinks others as bad as himself; said my lord would give me five hundred francs to know what you were doing, and find out whether the lady who travelled with us to Basle last Sunday is here in this house." "I've no objection to your taking his money if you will tell me something.