Wouldn't it be delicious to do that if she could only find out! But this last brought her up against a disquieting lesson lately learned. Namely, against recognition of how very far the lives of men even those we know most dearly and closely and the lives of us women are really apart. She thought of her father and Darcy Faircloth and their entirely unsuspected relation.

She got into the boat, unfurled the sail, and fastened it as she had learned in that first brief lesson. She saw that it caught the light breeze, and this was all she cared for.

Sometimes I give a short and familiar lecture on some useful subject connected with science or art, or the principles of duty. Sometimes we have a general reading lesson. Sometimes we turn the school into a Bible class. Again, the time is occupied in attending to some general business of the school.

To those who believe in the doctrine of the bodily presence of Jesus Christ in the eucharist this act contains a sublime lesson of humiliation and reverence; for to see the pomp and power of an earthly potentate resigned, so to speak, before the presence of God, must certainly be to them a spectacle both moving and edifying.

It was a lesson of value to the whole community. It was quite true that the constitution placed the army in a state of dependence on the civil power.

Yet she had learned no lesson,—she seemed incapable of profiting by experience,—and the old policy of tyranny and rapacity was exercised over these islands until Cuba, the largest of them, was driven into insurrection.

So I went to a doctor I knowed, he says, 'an' got a certificate from him to this private institution, where we could stay for a while an' get posted on romantics. "'Then, says I, 'the upshot was that you wanted to teach a lesson. "'Jus' that, says he. "'All right, says I; 'it's teached. An' now let's get out of this as quick as we kin.

Susy was not willing; indeed, she was very much frightened, and begged her mother to excuse her in some way to Mrs. Lovejoy, or, if that would not do, to go herself and explain the matter for her. But, as it was Susy's own affair, Mrs. Parlin wished to have as little to do with it as possible. Besides, she considered it a good opportunity to teach Susy a lesson in moral courage.

They are not ready yet for truth in the abstract it must be seen in a person. Instead of the story, as in the Primary class, there must be a mingling of vivid word pictures by the teacher and question and answer. The children should not be told to "study the lesson," for they do not know how, but rather have assigned to them one definite thing to prepare for the recitation.

"Spirit that searchest for the Unseen," it said, "because I will not that no atom of true worth should perish, unto thee shall be given a vision unto thee shall be taught a lesson thou dreamest not of. THOU shalt create; THOU shalt design and plan; THOU shalt be worshipped, and THOU shalt destroy!