I complain, I confess, and am a little impatient in a very sharp fit, but I do not arrive to such a degree of despair as he who with: "Ejulatu, questu, gemitu, fremitibus Resonando, multum flebiles voces refert:" Verses of Attius, in his Phaloctetes, quoted by Cicero, De Finib., ii. 29; Tusc.

He remembered that day at the Hotel St. Malo! Well, the bolt was shot: the worst was over. Quid refert? Justify himself? Certainly, to all but Delia Gasgoyne. Thousands of men did the same did it in cold blood, without one honest feeling. He did it, at least under a powerful influence. He could not help but smile now at the thought of how he had filled both sides of the equation.

There is nothing more probable than the conformity and relation of the body to the soul: "Ipsi animi magni refert, quali in corpore locati sint: multo enim a corpore existunt, qux acuant mentem: multa qua obtundant;" Cicero, Tusc.

After which he entered upon the order of the whole service, full of weighty and important considerations: "Nec minimo sane discrimine refert, Quo gestu lepores, et quo gallina secetur;" and all this set out with lofty and magnificent words, the very same we make use of when we discourse of the government of an empire.

To the last of the above-mentioned plants, Baptista Porta ascribes the most wonderful powers, his words being: Planta quæ non solum edentibus, sed et genitale languentibus tantum valet, ut coire summe desiderant, quoties fere velint, possint; alios duodecies profecisse, alios ad sexaginta vices pervenisse, refert.

He did his utmost to be philosophical and say his quid refert, but it was easier tried than done; for Jacques Pontiac's words kept rankling in his mind, and he found himself carrying round a vague load, which made him abstracted occasionally, and often a little reckless in action and speech.

Sect. 5. Now, last of all, we find yet another point, whereby the Bishop departeth from the example and mind of Christ. He saith that, by the sacramental word, “This is my body,” the bread is made the sacrament, &c.; and that without this word, &c., all our prayers and wishes should serve to no use. Where he will have the bread to be otherwise consecrated by us than it was consecrated by Christ; for that Christ did not consecrate the bread to be the sacrament of his body by those words, “This is my body,” it is manifest, because the bread was consecrated before his pronouncing of those words; or else what meaneth the blessing of it before he brake it? It was both blessed and broken, and he was also distributing it to the disciples, before ever he said, “This is my body.” Beza saith, Benedictionem expresse ad panis consecrationem et quidem singularem, refert; et omnes nostri referunt, consecrationem intelligentes, &c. Pareus saith, Qua ex communi cibo, in spiritualis alimoniae sacramentum transmutetur. Wherefore we must not think to sanctify the bread by this prescript word, “This is my body,” but by prayer and thanksgiving, as Christ did. Our divines hold against the Papists, Verba illa quoe in sacramento sunt consecrata, non esse paucula quoedam proscripta; sed praecipue verba orationis, quoe non sunt proescripta; and that, “through use of the prayers of the church, there is a change in the elements.” Dr Fulk objecteth against Gregory Martin, “Your popish church doth not either as the Greek liturgies, or as the churches in Ambrose and Augustine’s time, for they hold that the elements are consecrated by prayer and thanksgiving.” I know none who will speak with Bishop Lindsey in this point except Papists: yet Cornelius

He did his utmost to be philosophical and say his quid refert, but it was easier tried than done; for Jacques Pontiac's words kept rankling in his mind, and he found himself carrying round a vague load, which made him abstracted occasionally, and often a little reckless in action and speech.

"Reveillez-vous gens qui dormez, Priez Dieu pour les trépassez." was no soothing lullaby. "Tis all one to lie in St. Innocents' churchyard as in the sands of Egypt, ready to be anything in the ecstasy of being ever, and as content with six feet as the moles of Adrianus." "Tabesne cadavera solvat An rogas haud refert." A curious early fifteenth-century rhyme is associated with this charnel-house.

He remembered that day at the Hotel St. Malo! Well, the bolt was shot: the worst was over. Quid refert? Justify himself? Certainly, to all but Delia Gasgoyne. Thousands of men did the same did it in cold blood, without one honest feeling. He did it, at least under a powerful influence. He could not help but smile now at the thought of how he had filled both sides of the equation.