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"Don't notice it." He stretched out his hand to brush the morsels of paper off the table. Those morsels raised a sudden suspicion in my mind. I stopped him. "You have heard from Mr. Playmore!" I said. "Tell me the truth, Benjamin. Yes or no?" Benjamin blushed a shade deeper, and answered, "Yes." "Where is the letter?" "I mustn't show it to you, Valeria."

When you have nothing else to think about, think sometimes, as kindly as you can, of your poor, ugly Playmore: The lost words and phrases supplied in this concluding portion of the letter are so few in number that it is needless to mention them.

He may be the falsest of men in all besides, but he is true to her he has not misled me in that one thing. There are signs that never deceive a woman when a man is talking to her of what is really near his heart: I saw those signs. It is as true that I poisoned her as that he did. I am ashamed to set my opinion against yours, Mr. Playmore; but I really cannot help it.

Let us go over a part of the ground again, and let me ask you some questions as we proceed. Do you feel any objection to obliging me in this matter?" "Certainly not, Mr. Playmore. How far shall we go back?" "To your visit to Dexter with your mother-in-law. When you first asked him if he had any ideas of his own on the subject of Mrs.

Playmore passing over the claims of economy in favor of the claims of humanity suggested that we should privately start a subscription, and offered to head the list liberally himself. I must have written all these pages to very little purpose if it is necessary for me to add that I instantly sent a letter to Mr.

Playmore wants to help him, if he decides to go on. Have you any message to send, Valeria?" "No. I have done with it, Benjamin; I have nothing more to say." "Shall I write and tell you how it ends, if Mr. Playmore does really try the experiment at Gleninch?" I answered, as I felt, a little bitterly. "Yes," I said "Write and tell me if the experiment fail." My old friend smiled.

Playmore the second good friend, who had formally protested against the seizure of my husband's papers. Fortified by this resolution, I turned the page, and read the history of the third day of the Trial. There now remained the third and final question What was His Motive? The first evidence called in answer to that inquiry was the evidence of relatives and friends of the dead wife.

He could drink in the yellowish green, with here and there in the distance a little house; and about two miles away smoke stealing up from the midst of the plantation where Playmore was Playmore, his father's house to be his own one day. How good it was!

The delicate business of separating these pieces of paper, and of preserving them in the order in which they had adhered to each other, was assigned to the practiced fingers of the chemist. But the difficulties of his task did not end here. To Mr. Playmore and Benjamin the prospect of successfully putting the letter together, under these disadvantages, seemed to be almost hopeless.

Playmore. Recalling, for the purpose of my letter, all that Miserrimus Dexter had said to me, my memory dwelt with special interest on the strange outbreak of feeling which had led him to betray the secret of his infatuation for Eustace's first wife.