Venerisque huic maximus usus Progenies; urbi Pater est, urbique Maritus. For I apprehend that passage is generally misunderstood." "I really do not remember," answered the author. "Pray, sir, what do you take to be the meaning?" "I apprehend, sir," replied Booth, "that by these words, Urbi Pater est, urbique Maritus, Cato is represented as the father and husband to the city of Rome."

"Upon my word that's true," cries the author; "I did not think of it. It is much finer than the other. Urbis Pater est what is the other? ay Urbis Maritus. It is certainly as you say, sir." Booth was by this pretty well satisfied of the author's profound learning; however, he was willing to try him a little farther.

'I am quite aware, said King, 'that the first stanza is about the extent of your knowledge, but continue, sweet one, continue. Gravibus, by the way, is usually translated as "troublesome." Beetle drew a long and tortured breath. 'Milesne Crassi, had has the soldier of Crassus vixit, lived turpis maritus, a disgraceful husband 'You slurred the quantity of the word after turpis, said King.

Mantour's reading of the inscription is, Caius Sextius Lucius, Maritus JULIÆ Incomparabilis, Curavit Fieri PARENTIBUS SUIS; which he translates into Caius Sextius Lucius, Husband of Julia, caused this Monument to be erected to the Memory of his Ancestors, and the victories achieved by them in Provence, which on different occasions had been the theatre of war of the Romans.

Lex Burgundionum, Add. primum, xiii: quaecumque mulier Burgundia vel Romana voluntate sua ad maritum ambulaverit, iubemus ut maritus ipse de facultate ipsius mulieris, sicut in eam habet potestatem, ita et de rebus suis habeat.

"Sanctissimae et charissimae conjugi ALISONAE HERIOT, Jacobi Primrosii, Regia Majestatis in Sanctiori Concilio Regni Scotia Amanuensis, filiae, fernina omnibus turn animi turn corporis dotibus, ac pio cultu instructissimae, maestissimus ipsius maritus GEORGIUS HERIOT, ARMIGER, Regis, Reginae, Principum Henrici et Caroli Gemmarius, bene merenti, non sine lachrymis, hoc Monumentum pie posuit.

Cf. lex Wisigothorum, iv, 2, 11: maritus et uxor tunc sibi hereditario iure succedant, quando mulla affinitas usque ad septimum gradum de propinquis eorum vel parentibus inveniri poterit. See also Lex Burgundionum, 14, 1. Lex Saxonum, ix. Lex Ripuariorum, 37, 2. Lex Saxonum, viii. Lex Wisigothorum, iv, 3, 3. Lex Burgundionum 85, 1, and 62, 1. Lex Burgundionum, 42, 1; 62, 1; 74, 1.

"Upon my word that's true," cries the author; "I did not think of it. It is much finer than the other. Urbis Pater est what is the other? ay Urbis Maritus. It is certainly as you say, sir." Booth was by this pretty well satisfied of the author's profound learning; however, he was willing to try him a little farther.

Edictum Rotharis, 188: si puella libera aut vidua sine voluntate parentum ad maritum ambulaverit, liberum tamen, tunc maritus, qui eam acceperit uxorem, componat pro anagrip solidos XX et propter faidam alios XX. Lex Wisigothorum, iii, 2, 2. Ibid., iii, 2, 3. Lex Saxonum, vi, I: uxorem ducturus CCC solidos det parentibus eius. See also the lex Burgundionum, 66, I and 2 and 3.

Venerisque huic maximus usus Progenies; urbi Pater est, urbique Maritus. For I apprehend that passage is generally misunderstood." "I really do not remember," answered the author. "Pray, sir, what do you take to be the meaning?" "I apprehend, sir," replied Booth, "that by these words, Urbi Pater est, urbique Maritus, Cato is represented as the father and husband to the city of Rome."