I'll have no thruck with you or yours," sez I. "Take your child away, ye shameless woman." "'An' am I shameless?" sez she, bringin' her hands up above her head. "Thin what are you, ye lyin', schamin', weak-kneed, dhirty-souled son av a sutler? Am I shameless? Who put the open shame on me an' my child that we shud go beggin' through the lines in the broad daylight for the broken word of a man?

Her hands twisting in his, she stared past him, out through the window, where the still, sunny day shone blue through shadowy pine branches. Tears rolled down her face. "Can't you go back?" She turned the desolate, haunted eyes upon him. "Oh, can't you? to do some kindness to him? Can you ever stop a-thinkin' of him lyin' there?" Prosper's face was hard through its gentleness.

Hume is up early this mornin'. But everything was quiet as the grave," in a hushed dramatic tone. "Sorra the sound did I hear. So I gets up and goes in. And in the front room I sees him lyin'. Mr. Hume was never a handsome man, sir; and he'd gained nothing in looks by the end he'd met with. God save us, how I ever got out into the street, I'll never know."

"Beating won't make me tell," replied Allie, with intensity. "Nothing will if I don't want to. My game is for my life. You know I've no chance among four men like you." "Aw, I don't know about thet," he blustered. "I can take care of you.... But, say, if you'd stand fer Frank, mebbe I'll take you up.... Girl, are you lyin' about thet gold?" "No." "Why didn't the trapper dig it up?

"An' fancy 'er 'ardly able to sew on a button, which is very dangerous lyin' about on the floor, as children will eat anythin', not knowin' the consequences," she cried. Chook pointed out that there were no children in the house to eat stray buttons. "An' thankful you ought to be for that," she cried.

There was a firm set to his clean-shaven lips, but the eyes burned with a gentle light; a certain hope, positive now, seemed to be looming up in them. Tod watched him for an instant, and said: "What do ye think of it, cap'n?" "I ain't made up my mind." "Is he lyin'?" "I don't know. Seems too good to be true. He's got some things right; some things he ain't.

"Well, you'll see yerself groanin' an' lyin' on the ground in the Digger, now," replied the Sergeant, and, as much in sorrow as in anger, he added, "An' you're the bloke I signed a petition for his permotion are yer? At it agin a'ready!" "But, good Heavens, man, can't you see I'm as sober as you are, and much less excited? Can't you send for the key of the mortuary and call the doctor?

She bid me call to see the spot where you're lyin', my buried flower, an' to tell you that we're not now, thanks be to God, as we wor whin you lived wid us. We are well to do now, acushla oge machree, an' not in hunger, an' sickness, an' misery, as we wor whin you suffered them all!

Did ye see us, though, Captin, whin we come in on their right flank? By George, we murthered um. There's more'n a hundred lyin' in hapes back there. As for old Stilton, I just caught sight of um behind that wood to our left, an' he's makin' for the enemy's right rair. He'll have lots o' prisoners in half an hour."

And when the bell-boy who had shown the unwelcome guest to his room came back to his bench in the office, he interrogated him, with a grin that was not altogether facetious: "Any revolvers lyin' round up in No. 20, or any of those knobby blue bottles?" "Naw," said the bell-boy, disgustedly, "ner no dimes, neither."