"But about a month ago I fell-in and said I couldn't kick my heels any longer. Hadn't two to kick, in point of fact!" He laughed softly at the grim jest. "So they lushed me up to this outfit, and gave me a job as King's Messenger. I'm carrying despatches between the Admiralty and the Fleet Flagship. Better'n doing nothing," he added half-apologetically.

"They are all in bed, Sir," said he "Bess as well as the rest; indeed, the old girl has lushed so well at the bingo, that she sleeps as if her next morrow was the day of judgment. I have, also, seen that the street door is still unbarred, so that, upon the whole, we have, perhaps, as good a chance to-night as we may ever have again. All my fear is about that cowardly lubber.

"Yes she does," said Muffie, "she sawed you coming up the path." "An' she lushed out of the loom," volunteered Max. "Well," said Hugh, "she's got to see me, for it's very important. Will you go to her room, Muffie, and say Mr. Kinross begs to see her as a special favour?" "Oh," said Muffie, "she isn't in her room.

Two half-quartern brans; pound of best fresh; piece of double Glo'ster; and, to wind up all, some of the richest sort you ever lushed! Uttering this last panegyric, Master Bates produced, from one of his extensive pockets, a full-sized wine-bottle, carefully corked; while Mr.

A man's voice growled harshly it was like the snarl of a wild beast, "Three nights you done no good. Blarst yer slobberin'! you ain't got no more savvey than a blank blank cow. I'd put a new head on yer for tuppence." A woman answered, "You've struck me, you swine; and if I've got a black eye I'll quod you, sure as I'm yere. Ain't I lushed you, and fed you, and found your clobber long enough?"

"Two more Martinis an' another plain soda, please, Bobby." The First Lieutenant laughed. "Who's the soda water for me?" Mouldy shook his head lugubriously. "No," he replied, "me. There was another bird there this morning being lushed up to a bar to his D.S.O. an R.N.R. Lieutenant called Gedge. What you'd call a broth of a boy. We had lunch together afterwards."

"They are all in bed, Sir," said he "Bess as well as the rest; indeed, the old girl has lushed so well at the bingo, that she sleeps as if her next morrow was the day of judgment. I have, also, seen that the street door is still unbarred, so that, upon the whole, we have, perhaps, as good a chance to-night as we may ever have again. All my fear is about that cowardly lubber.

Johnny lushed down his second saucer of coffee before he attempted to marshall his thoughts into speech. But, having accomplished this, he said, "Doug and me are gregus great friends, Mr. Fowler. There ain't anybody in Lost Chief thinks as much of him as I do." The preacher nodded. "Douglas says he's fond of you." "I guess he is," returned Johnny, condescendingly.