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Coke's interpretation of this chapter of Magna Carta is of a piece with his absurd and gratuitous interpretation of the words "nec super eum ibimus, nec super eum mittemus," which was pointed out in a former article, and by which he attempted to give a judicial power to the king and his judges, where Magna Carta had given it only to a jury.

XIII. Whenever Tacitus ends a sentence with a polysyllabic word of five syllables he avoids its repetition at the close of the next sentence. The Roman poets are not so particular in this respect, Virgil, for instance, writes, after the Homeric fashion, by the omission of the preposition: "At nos hinc alii sitientis ibimus Afros: Ecl. for "ad Afros." I. The Gift for the recovery of Livia.

There has been much confusion and doubt as to the true meaning of the words, "nec super eum ibimus, neo super eum mittemus." The more common rendering has been, "nor wilt we pass upon him, nor condemn him." But some have translated them to mean, "nor will we pass upon him, nor commit him to prison."

Admirable indeed in their frankness, their constancy, their sterling independence, are the friendships it has delighted him to record. From the devoted, almost passionate tribute to Maecenas "Ibimus ibimus Uteunque praecedes supremum Carpere iter comites parati,"

The chapter guaranteeing the trial by jury is in these words: "Nullus liber homo capiatur, vel imprisonetur, aut disseisetur, aut utlagetor, aut exuletur, aut aliquo modo destruatur; nec super eum ibimus, nec super eum mittemus, nisi per legale judicium parium suorum, vel per legem terrae." "Nec super eum ibimus, nec super eum mittemus."

The good man turned round and almost fell off the steps with the nervous shock of beholding me so near him: he descended with precipitation, and shook me so warmly and tightly by the hand, that he brought tears into my eyes, as well as his own. "Gently, my good friend," said I "parce precor, or you will force me to say, 'ibimus una ambo, flentes valido connexi foedere."

In the first place, "nor will we pass upon him," meaning thereby to decide upon his guilt or innocence judicially is not a correct rendering of the words, "nec super eum ibimus." There is nothing whatever, in these latter words, that indicates judicial action or opinion at all. The words, in their common signification, describe physical action alone.

We're brothers in arms, for good or evil, Brooke." Brooke began to whistle, and then murmured some words like these: "Non ego perfidum Dixi sacramentum: ibimus, ibimus, Utcunque praecedes, supremum Carpere iter comites parati." "What do you say?" asked Talbot. "Oh, nothing," said Brooke; "dog Latin some rubbish from Horace.

At the end of the Act of Contrition, he said, with great humility and confidence, “Col rostro adjutoand expressed his Christian hope, saying, “In Domumm Domini ibimus.” As the cardinal, bathed in tears, hesitated to pronounce the words of final adieu—“Proficiscere anima Christiana” —the Holy Father inspired the courage so necessary at the hour of separation, be, himself uttering the words, “Si Proficiscere.” He must bless, once more, the Sacred College, the members of which were all kneeling around him.

The good man turned round and almost fell off the steps with the nervous shock of beholding me so near him: he descended with precipitation, and shook me so warmly and tightly by the hand, that he brought tears into my eyes, as well as his own. "Gently, my good friend," said I "parce precor, or you will force me to say, 'ibimus una ambo, flentes valido connexi foedere."