Ibimus, ibimus, Utcunque praecedes, supremum Carpere iter comites parati. Enough, Horace, of these mortuary musings. You loved the lesson of the roses, and now and again would speak somewhat like a death's head over thy temperate cups of Sabine ordinaire.

Johnson, instead of rupibus obsita, had written imbribus uvida, and uvida nubibus, but struck them both out. Lines 15 and 16. Instead of these two lines, he had written, but afterwards struck out, the following: Parare posse, utcunque jactet Grandiloquus nimis alta Zeno. BOSWELL. In Johnson's Works, i. 167, these lines are given with some variations, which perhaps are in part due to Mr.

We're brothers in arms, for good or evil, Brooke." Brooke began to whistle, and then murmured some words like these: "Non ego perfidum Dixi sacramentum: ibimus, ibimus, Utcunque praecedes, supremum Carpere iter comites parati." "What do you say?" asked Talbot. "Oh, nothing," said Brooke; "dog Latin some rubbish from Horace.

These several adventures, with the Knight's behaviour in them, gave me as pleasant a day as ever I met with in any of my travels. No. 123, SATURDAY, JULY 21. Doctrina sed vim promovet insitam, Rectique cultus pectora roborant: Utcunque defecere mores, Dedecorant bene nata culpae. HOR. Od. iv. 1. 4. ver. 33.

"'Utcunque dulci, Tyndare, fistula, Valles, etc. What a lovely ode that is! What knowledge of town life! what susceptibility to the rural! Of all the Latins, Horace is the only one with whom I could wish to have spent a week. But no! I could not have discussed the brief span of human life with locks steeped in Malobathran balm and wreathed with that silly myrtle.

Horace is said to have written the Ode in praise of Drusus at the desire of Augustus; and while the poet celebrates the military courage of the prince, he insinuates indirectly a salutary admonition to the cultivation of the civil virtues: Doctrina sed vim promovet insitam, Rectique cultus pectora roborant: Utcunque defecere mores, Dedecorant bene nata culpae. Ode iv. 4.

Infelix utcunque ferent ea fata minores. And it is a question which was treated also, as we all happen to know, in that other form of writing for which this author expresses so decided a preference, in which the art of the poet is brought in to enforce and impress the conclusion of the philosopher.

These several Adventures, with the Knight's Behaviour in them, gave me as pleasant a Day as ever I met with in any of my Travels. No. 123. Saturday, July 21, 1711. Addison. 'Doctrina sed vim promovet insitam, Rectique cultus pectora roborant: Utcunque defecere mores, Dedecorant bene nata culpae. Hor.