Halvers, I'm thinking?" "That is the business, sir," says James. "Well, well," says Alan; and then in the same tone of childlike interest, "it has naething to do with the Seahorse, then?" he asked. "With what?" says James. "Or the lad that I have just kicked the bottom of behind yon windmill?" pursued Alan. "Hut, man! have done with your lees! I have Palliser's letter here in my pouch.

Did you ever see a big boss that would go halvers with his men in flush times, and of his own notion pay 'em extry? No, you never did. But when the fires are mostly out, oh! then we must live on half wages and be thunderin' thankful to git that. I say there ain't one o' them that cares a copper cent for one of us, 'cept just for what he can git outen us.

"When I was down the coast, last week, so far as Littlehampton," said a stout young man in the corner, "a very coorous thing happened me, leastways by my own opinion, and glad shall I be to have the judgment of Cappen Zeb consarning it. There come in there a queer-rigged craft of some sixty ton from Halvers, desiring to set up trade again, or to do some smoogling, or spying perhaps.

He looked at me direct. I shook my head; I was sternly resolved not to be over tempted. "What? No? You will wait another turn? Very well. How about you, sir?" to the Colonel. "I'll go halvers with you, Colonel," Bill proposed. "I'm on," agreed the Colonel. "There's the soap. And foh the honor of the grand old Empire State we will let our friend pick the ace foh us.

"Hout, lad," said Edie, getting down in his room "let me try my hand for an auld bedral; ye're gude seekers, but ill finders." So soon as he got into the grave, he struck his pike-staff forcibly down; it encountered resistance in its descent, and the beggar exclaimed, like a Scotch schoolboy when he finds anything, "Nae halvers and quarters hale o' mine ain and 'nane o' my neighbour's."

He winked at the soldier as he spoke a sly, humorous wink a wink which hinted at a good joke to come. The dragoon, a fat, good-natured man', grinned in reply. "I won't split on you, you young thieves. I've taken my share of loot before this, and I expect some pickings out of the croppies' houses before I've done. I won't cry halvers on you. What's yours is yours. But tell us what it is."

"Hout, lad," said Edie, getting down in his room "let me try my hand for an auld bedral; ye're gude seekers, but ill finders." So soon as he got into the grave, he struck his pike-staff forcibly down; it encountered resistance in its descent, and the beggar exclaimed, like a Scotch schoolboy when he finds anything, "Nae halvers and quarters hale o' mine ain and 'nane o' my neighbour's."

"Yes, you can. I don't put on style. It won't cost us more than a dollar and a half a week for each rent, eating, and everything else. I was thinking, as you're a learner, it will be a long time before you can make much, and you'd be glad to go halvers with somebody. Two can always live cheaper than one." A dollar and a half a week! That was indeed cheaper than I had been living.

Halvers, I'm thinking?" "That is the business, sir," said James. "Well, well," said Alan; and then in the same tone of childlike interest, "it has naething to do with the Seahorse, then?" he asked, "With what?" says James. "Or the lad that I have just kicked the bottom of behind yon windmill?" pursued Alan. "Hut, man! have done with your lees! I have Palliser's letter here in my pouch.

He was here in an early day, and he was the handyest man about takin' holt of anything that come along you most ever see, I judge. He was a cheerful, stirrin' cretur, always doin' somethin', and no man can say he ever see him do anything by halvers.