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The society was pleasant, and I was taken to Kenilworth and Warwick Castle, on the banks of the Avon, a noble place, still bearing marks of the Wars of the Roses. I never saw such magnificent oak-trees as those on the Leigh estate, near Guy's Cliff. I then visited my maiden namesake, Mrs. Fairfax, of Gilling Castle, Yorkshire.

Dennie and Gilling. "But my mother is not as strong as she looks and it would be a blow to her to leave this place and we are the Squire's tenants, and therefore at Chatfield's mercy. And you know that Chatfield does as he likes! Now do you understand?" "It maddens me to think that you should be at Chatfield's mercy!" muttered Copplestone.

The other is Addie Chatfield was certainly in Bristol on that date and for eleven days after it." "Well what next?" asked Copplestone. "I've been thinking that over while you stared at the bill," answered Gilling. "I think the best thing will be to find out where Addie Chatfield put herself up during her stay.

Schofield began, a few minutes later, looking suddenly mystified "where where " "Where what?" Mr. Schofield asked testily. "What are you talking about?" His nerves were jarred, and he was rather hoarse after what he had been saying to Penrod. Schofield demanded. "I don't see any sense to it." "But where is your old classmate?" she cried. "Where's Mr. Gilling?"

Vickers, that Chatfield solemnly insisted to you that he did not know that the man who had posed as Marston Greyle was not Marston Greyle?" "He did," replied Vickers, "and though Chatfield is an unmitigated old scoundrel, I believe him." "You do!" exclaimed Gilling, who was listening eagerly. "Oh, come!"

He's not to be lost sight of until this mystery is cleared. Because something is wrong." Copplestone considered matters in silence for a few moments, and decided not to reveal the story of Zachary Spurge to Gilling yet awhile at any rate. However, he had news which there was no harm in communicating.

"There I made a mess of it, I confess," he admitted. "But it never struck me they'd separate. I thought, of course, they'd drive straight to some hotel, and " "And the long and the short of it is, Greyle's slipped you," said Gilling. "Well there's no more to be done tonight. The only thing of value is that Greyle called at the Fragonard.

You've two good clues the fact that he visited the Fragonard Club and that particular tobacconist's shop. Urge Swallow to do his best the man must be kept in sight. See to both these things immediately." "Swallow is at work already," replied Gilling. "He's got good help, too, and his failure yesterday has put him on his mettle. As for me, I'll go to Falmouth by the next express.

"Oh, that's easy to reckon up," answered Gilling. "I see through it. They want creditable and respectable witnesses to something or other. This big, heavy-jowled man is Chatfield, of course?" "That's Chatfield," responded Copplestone. "What's he after?" For the agent, as the two young men approached, ostentiously turned away from them, moving a few steps from the door.

"Might have been livelier and more satisfactory," answered Gilling, "if it hadn't been for the factor which none of us can help luck! We tracked the Squire." "You did?" exclaimed Copplestone. "Where?" "When I said we I should have said Swallow," continued Gilling. "You remember that afternoon of our return from Bristol, Copplestone?