"If you can manage that you will have eternal claims to my gratitude. Good-day, my dear M. Fraisier. Till to-morrow " Fraisier went. His parting bow was a degree less cringing than on the first occasion. "I am to dine to-morrow with President de Marville!" he said to himself. "Come now, I have these folk in my power.

There she and her husband would be near their children and in their own house, while the addition would round out the Marville property.

"Now, as M. and Mme. de Marville are scarcely turned fifty, Cecile's expectations are bills that will not fall due for fifteen or twenty years to come; and no young fellow cares to keep them so long in his portfolio.

To tell a rich man that he is poor! you might as well tell the Archbishop of Granada that his homilies show signs of senility. Mme. la Presidente, proud of her husband's position, of the estate of Marville, and her invitations to court balls, was keenly susceptible on this point; and what was worse, the remark came from a poverty-stricken musician to whom she had been charitable.

"I have often admired," said Vigneul de Marville, who knew him at a late period of his life, "the love he had for his art.

"If you can manage that you will have eternal claims to my gratitude. Good-day, my dear M. Fraisier. Till to-morrow " Fraisier went. His parting bow was a degree less cringing than on the first occasion. "I am to dine to-morrow with President de Marville!" he said to himself. "Come now, I have these folk in my power.

Vigneul de Marville asked him one day how he had reached so high a rank among the great painters. 'I tried to neglect nothing, replied Poussin. True, indeed, he had neglected nothing. He gave his days and nights to the acquirement of various sciences.

Vigneul de Marville saw him "nearer heaven than earth" in a room which a light curtain divided into two. "The wind, always at the service of philosophers, running ahead of visitors, would lift this curtain adroitly, and reveal the philosopher, smiling with pleasure at the opportunity of distilling the elixir of his meditations into the brain and the heart of a listener."

Popinot took up the victim's cause so warmly that he told the story to Mme. Popinot as soon as he went home, and that excellent and noble-natured woman spoke to the Presidente on the subject at the first opportunity. As Popinot himself likewise said a word or two to the President, there was a general explanation in the family of Camusot de Marville.

"Truly, a man is known by the company he keeps. No credit to any one to be connected with the Count de Marville." Madame de Grandmaison felt rather subdued. She perceived that the Lady de Tilly was not favorably impressed towards the Intendant. But she tried again: "And then, my Lady, the Intendant is so powerful at Court.