"You can't carry this hidee through without my 'elp." "We hired you to take us to the woods." "You 'ired me and my wagin and them harticles whoa!" You didn't 'ire me for 'Awley's, and I haint goin' ther' without a new contract." "What difference is it to you where we go?" Dick demanded. "You belong to us for the day."

And a comfortable 'ome awaitin' 'er with two 'ired girls to do the work and plenty of hands on the farm and the best of cheese and butter and the Harmonium in the parlor and drives to and fro' the Church and behind it all a solid man a solid man what do ye think she'd 'uv said?" Was ever man more in earnest, now that it had suddenly broken from him after all these years, than honest Farmer Wise?

"No, 'e wasn't drunk," said the little man loyally, "the liquor was no more than feelin' its way round inside of 'im; but 'e went an' filled that 'ole bloomin' palanquin with bottles 'fore 'e went off. 'E's gone an' 'ired six men to carry 'im, an' I 'ad to 'elp 'im into 'is nupshal couch, 'cause 'e wouldn't 'ear reason.

"I'd left the spade just where I could find it. I'd got everything planned and right. I 'ired a little trap in Colchester, and pretended I wanted to go to Ipswich and stop the night, and come back next day, and the chap I 'ired it from made me leave two sovrings on it right away, and off I set. "I didn't go to no Ipswich neither.

The 'ead bridge man 'as bin preachin' to me ever since 'e 'ired me, hand we made hup the gang in New York, to look hout hand keep my men from bein' enlisted. Say, youngster, his yours a good regiment?" "The very best in the army," unhesitatingly as serted Shorty. "All free-born American citizens, and high-toned gentlemen. I tell you, they're daisies, they are."

'No, 'e wasn't drunk, said the little man loyally, 'the liquor was no more than feelin' its way round inside of 'im; but 'e went an' filled that 'ole bloomin' palanquin with bottles 'fore 'e went off. 'E's gone an' 'ired six men to carry 'im, an' I 'ad to 'elp 'im into 'is nupshal couch, 'cause 'e wouldn't 'ear reason.

That is the girl, isn't it, Mrs. Cox's niece? Which " "Ay," said the woman, "that's Milly, the 'ired girl; she's no I more than that, if she be her aunt's niece. And 'ard work for one's niece. Me and Woods, if we'd 'ad one, would have done better for her nor that, makin' her work like a slave or a dummy.

She in'erited it from 'er father. Very kind-'earted woman ... always gives 'er box to orphans and widders and people like that!" "Then the ladies in the box now are not friends of hers?" John asked, meaning by "friends," relatives. "I shouldn't think so," the attendant answered. "I noticed the party comin' in. They come in a 'ired carriage.

But it is commodious, and possesses a side-chamber which will serve us admirably for a green-room when the proprietor an affable person by the name of Tench has removed the onions at present drying on the floor; which he has engaged to do." "Are you tellin' me," inquired Sam, "that you've been and 'ired the room?" "At the derisory charge of four-and-six for the night.