His movement had shown such terror; and the way he stared to leeward made me think he saw something uncanny. "What the deuce is up with you?" I asked, sharply. And then I remembered the Second Mate. I glanced forrard to where he lounged. His back was still towards us, and he had not seen Tammy. Then I turned to the boy. "For goodness sake, get to looard before the Second sees you!" I said.

We just put this Farallone before the wind, and run till we're well to looard of our port of departure, and reasonably well up with some other place where they have an American consul. Down goes the Farallone, and good-bye to her! A day or so in the boat; the consul packs us home, at Uncle Sam's expense, to 'Frisco; and if that merchant don't put the dollars down, you come to me!"

It's the the Gentlemen, if you'll only pull ahead, and let me heave you the headline, you won't have to come a-near the raft please do." "Set her back, John, set her back!" says one. They backed water. "Keep away, boy keep to looard. Confound it, I just expect the wind has blowed it to us. Your pap's got the small-pox, and you know it precious well. Why didn't you come out and say so?

"Why, after waiting until I was sure they were gone, I'd come home." "And your flag?" "Half-mast." "Half-mast that's it. I hope you'll never have to fly a half-masted flag, Johnnie. But suppose you did see them, and they were in shoal water, say and the shoals to looard, of course, and it blowing " "I'd stand in and get them." "And it blowing hard blowing hard, Johnnie? and shoal shoal water?"

Man, wouldn't it be fine if Tom O'Donnell himself was with us and the pair of us racing home? Let me take the wheel, Joe. And go for'ard and have a mug-up for yourself and have a care going, Joe, for it's leaping she is now and seas that'd lift you a cable's length to looard if ever they caught you fair. That's it oh, but if your mother could see you now, Joe, it's never to sea you'd come again."

I'd call that out to the dory as it went sliding by the quarter the vessel, of course, 'd be sailing all the time and next, 'Wind'ard dory to the rail! And then, when we'd gone ahead enough, again, 'Let go your looard dory! and then, 'Looard dory to the rail! Let go your wind'ard dory! Let go your looard dory! and so till they were all over the side."

It's the the Gentlemen, if you'll only pull ahead, and let me heave you the headline, you won't have to come a-near the raft please do." "Set her back, John, set her back!" says one. They backed water. "Keep away, boy keep to looard. Confound it, I just expect the wind has blowed it to us. Your pap's got the small-pox, and you know it precious well. Why didn't you come out and say so?

"He seems to be fighting with someone to looard of him. I can't see very plainly yet." Stubbins had got round on to the lee foot-rope, and now he held the lantern up, peering, and I made my way quickly alongside of him. The Second Mate followed; but instead of getting down on to the foot-rope, he got on the yard, and stood there holding on to the tie.

I jumped to attend to the painter just as Clancy's voice broke in from above: "Swing her off about two points, ease your main sheet and keep an eye on that light to looard. Off, off that's good hold her and Joe, slack stays'l and then foretops'l halyards. Be ready to let go balloon halyards and stand by down-haul. Look alive."

We just put this Farallone before the wind, and run till we're well to looard of our port of departure and reasonably well up with some other place, where they have an American Consul. Down goes the Farallone, and good-bye to her! A day or so in the boat; the consul packs us home, at Uncle Sam's expense, to 'Frisco; and if that merchant don't put the dollars down, you come to me!