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By this time he was quite sick, the bear, and could crawl no farther, so Keesh came up close and speared him to death." "And then?" Klosh-Kwan demanded. "Then we left Keesh skinning the bear, and came running that the news of the killing might be told." And in the afternoon of that day the women hauled in the meat of the bear while the men sat in council assembled.

He was eating, but he received them with respect and seated them according to their rank. Ikeega was proud and embarrassed by turns, but Keesh was quite composed. Klosh-Kwan recited the information brought by Bim and Bawn, and at its close said in a stern voice: "So explanation is wanted, O Keesh, of thy manner of hunting. Is there witchcraft in it?" Keesh looked up and smiled. "Nay, O Klosh-Kwan.

Always he declined company on these expeditions, and the people marvelled. "How does he do it?" they demanded of one another. "Never does he take a dog with him, and dogs are of such great help, too." "Why dost thou hunt only bear?" Klosh-Kwan once ventured to ask him. And Keesh made fitting answer. "It is well known that there is more meat on the bear," he said.

Because of the things he had done, they looked for him to appear again in the council, but he never came, and they were ashamed to ask. "I am minded to build me an igloo," he said one day to Klosh-Kwan and a number of the hunters. "It shall be a large igloo, wherein Ikeega and I can dwell in comfort." "Ay," they nodded gravely. "But I have no time. By business is hunting, and it takes all my time.

Always he declined company on these expeditions, and the people marveled. "How does he do it?" they demanded of one another. "Never does he take a dog with him, and dogs are of such great help, too." "Why dost thou hunt only bear?" Klosh-Kwan once ventured to ask. And Keesh made fitting answer. "It is well known that there is more meat on the bear," he said.

It was at a council, one night, in the big igloo of Klosh-Kwan, the chief, that Keesh showed the blood that ran in his veins and the manhood that stiffened his back. With the dignity of an elder, he rose to his feet, and waited for silence amid the babble of voices. "It is true that meat be apportioned me and mine," he said.

By this time he was quite sick, the bear, and could crawl no farther, so Keesh came up close and speared him to death." "And then?" Klosh-Kwan demanded. "Then we left Keesh skinning the bear, and came running that the news of the killing might be told." And in the afternoon of that day the women hauled in the meat of the bear while the men sat in council assembled.

As his father had done before him, he saw to it that the least old woman and the last old man received a fair portion, keeping no more for himself than his needs required. And because of this, and of his merit as a hunter, he was looked upon with respect, and even awe; and there was talk of making him chief after old Klosh-Kwan.

As his father had done before him, he saw to it that the least old woman and the last old man received a fair portion, keeping no more for himself than his needs required. And because of this, and of his merit as a hunter, he was looked upon with respect, and even awe; and there was talk of making him chief after old Klosh-Kwan.

When Keesh arrived a messenger was sent to him, bidding him come to the council. But he sent reply, saying that he was hungry and tired; also that his igloo was large and comfortable and could hold many men. And curiosity was so strong on the men that the whole council, Klosh-Kwan to the fore, rose up and went to the igloo of Keesh.