This week the question was, "Who are happy?" and Nettie was very eager to know what answers the other girls would bring. She was in good time, and sat resting and watching the boys and girls and teachers as they came in, before the school began. She was first there of all her class; and watching so eagerly to see those who were coming, that she did not know Mr. Folke was near till he spoke to her.

"You wont find it so, I think; or rather you will find they are all parts of the same character, and the blessing is one. But there are more ways of being a peacemaker. What do you do when the hinge of a door creaks?" One said "she didn't know;" another said "Nothing." "I stop my ears," said a third. Mr. Folke laughed. "That would not do for a peacemaker," he said.

Froude's opinion 'A sturdy high-hearted race, sound in body and fierce in spirit, and furnished with thews and sinews which, under the stimulus of those "great shins of beef," their common diet, were the wonder of the age. 'What comyn folke in all this world, says a State Paper in 1515, 'may compare with the comyns of England in riches, freedom, liberty, welfare, and all prosperity?

Because, as he saith, that there is so much gold now bestowed about the garnishing of the pieces of the Cross, that there is none left for poore folke. Is not this a high reason?

And Jesus will be their Shepherd; his sheep will not wander from him anymore; "and they shall see his face, and his name shall be in their foreheads." Nettie could hardly keep from crying as Mr. Folke went on; she felt as if she was half in heaven already, and it seemed very odd to cry for gladness; but she could not help it. Then the school closed with singing the hymn,

So sweet was the trust of the hymn, so unruffled the trust of the speaker. The words were from a little bit of a book of translations of German hymns which Mr. Folke, her Sunday-school teacher, had brought her, and which was never out of Nettie's hand. "'As God leads me so my heart In faith shall rest. No grief nor fear my soul shall part From Jesus' breast.

Give liberalye To neidfvl folke Denye nane of Them al for litle Thow knawest heir In this lyfe of what Chaunce may the Befall. The glory of the gallery, however, was its ceiling, which was of the seventeenth century work, and so wonderful that many learned persons used to come and study it.

Nettie started and turned. "How do you do?" said her teacher, kindly. "Are you quite well, Nettie, this morning?" For he thought she looked pale and tired. But her face coloured with pleasure and a smile shone all over it, as she told him she was very well. "Have you found out who are the happy people, Nettie?" "Yes, Mr. Folke; I have found a verse. But I knew before." "I thought you did.

Would angry people mind your asking?" "I don't know, sir. If they were very angry, I suppose they wouldn't." "Perhaps not. One thing is certain, Kizzy; you must have peace in your own heart, to give you the least chance." "How, Mr. Folke?" "If you want to put out a fire, you must not stick into it something that will catch?" "That would make the fire worse," said one of the girls. "Certainly.

Because, as he saith, that there is so much gold now bestowed about the garnishing of the pieces of the Cross, that there is none left for poore folke. Is not this a high reason?