"I take me oath, Willie," said the assassin earnestly, "th' on'y thing I really needs is a ball. Me t'roat feels like a fryin'-pan. But as I can't get a ball, why, th' next bes' thing is breakfast, an' if yeh do that for me, b'Gawd, I say yeh was th' whitest lad I ever see."

But all th' good hot grub yeh can eat. B'Gawd, I hung around there long as I could till th' ol' man fired me. 'Git t' hell outa here, yeh wuthless skunk, git t' hell outa here, an' go die, he ses. 'You're a hell of a father, I ses, 'you are, an' I quit 'im."

But his oration ceased as he saw their eyes, which were large with great tales. "We're goin' t' charge we're goin' t' charge!" cried the youth's friend, hastening with his news. "Charge?" said the lieutenant. "Charge? Well, b'Gawd! Now, this is real fightin'." Over his soiled countenance there went a boastful smile. "Charge? Well, b'Gawd!" A little group of soldiers surrounded the two youths.

But his oration ceased as he saw their eyes, which were large with great tales. "We're goin' t' charge we're goin' t' charge!" cried the youth's friend, hastening with his news. "Charge?" said the lieutenant. "Charge? Well, b'Gawd! Now, this is real fightin'." Over his soiled countenance there went a boastful smile. "Charge? Well, b'Gawd!" A little group of soldiers surrounded the two youths.

They thought it was a great joke, a score against the cabin. They thought Newman had boldly slipped away from work to meet the lady. "The Big Un's queenin', b'gawd, right under the Old Man's nose!" That's how Boston put it. I did nothing. I made no break. Luckily. At seven bells, Lynch marshaled us aft again, to set the spanker this time.

His friend gazed backward. "B'Gawd, it is," he assented. They mused. For a time the youth was obliged to reflect in a puzzled and uncertain way. His mind was undergoing a subtle change. It took moments for it to cast off its battleful ways and resume its accustomed course of thought.

"Ah, you always want to know what I take out, and you never see that I usually bring a package in here from my place of business." As the wanderers trudged slowly along Park Row, the assassin began to expand and grow blithe. "B'Gawd, we've been livin' like kings," he said, smacking appreciative lips. "Look out, or we'll have t' pay fer it t'night," said the youth with gloomy warning.

"B'Gawd, the Old Man's on deck!" ejaculated Lynch to his assistants. Then he bellowed aft, "Yes, sir?" "Reef t'gan's'l's, Mister!" came the command. "Eh!" blankly exclaimed Lynch. "Now, what is he up to?" But he yelled back his acknowledgment, "Reef t'gan's'ls, sir!" When the sails were clewed up, Newman and I were ordered aloft on the mizzen.

"I'm mighty sorry for her, same as you are, same as everyone is, save Fitz. If it wasn't that Swope has me body and soul, I'd side with Lynch, b'Gawd, in anything he wanted to start." "Shut up!" exclaimed Chips. "That's damn fool talk to come out o' your mouth." "Oh, you have softened me, Mary, you have unmanned me!" I heard Newman say.

His friend gazed backward. "B'Gawd, it is," he assented. They mused. For a time the youth was obliged to reflect in a puzzled and uncertain way. His mind was undergoing a subtle change. It took moments for it to cast off its battleful ways and resume its accustomed course of thought.