But the contrast in the criticism seems to be between the fine poetical passages in the de Rerum Natura and the mass of technical exposition of philosophy which must have repelled the "general reader" at all times. It suggests at once to Cicero to mention another poem on a similar subject, the Empedoclea of Sallustius, of which and its writer we know nothing.

The transported Natura no sooner heard he had done so, than he cried out, 'By what means, dear sir, was she prevailed upon to relinquish a title, by which she certainly hoped to make one day a very great advantage?

Often had Natura been present when his father received larger sums than this, and doubtless had the same opportunity as now to make himself master of some part, or all of it; but never till this unhappy exigence had the least temptation to do so.

The common belief adds, i.e. it is further believed, cf. His. 5, 5. 13: persuasio inerat. Illuc natura. Tantum is to be connected with illuc usque. Thus far only nature extends. So thought the ancients. Cf. A. 33: in ipso terrarum ac naturae fine. Et vera fama is parenthetic. The author endorses this part of the story. Ergo marks a return from the above digression. Suevici maris. The Baltic.

In the one under my charge there is an astonishing number of them; and naturally, where the long series of the ancient Indian wars, and later ones with civilized foes, form together so strong a strand in the thread of our history, there is a very great number proportionally of warlike weapons. I like to read old books, both ex officio and ex naturâ. But I need not enlarge upon this liking.

The sister and brother-in-law of Natura, it must be allowed, had the most cause, as they had a large family of children, who had a claim equally to the effects of both, in case they had died without issue; yet did not even they express any discontent, though Charlotte, within the first year of her marriage, brought two sons into the world, and a third in the next ensuing one, all which seemed likely to live, and enjoy their parents patrimony.

Natura told him to the villa of the baron d' Eyrac. 'The baron d' Eyrac, said the other, 'he lives twelve miles on the other side the wood, and that is five miles over. He then asked if there were no town near, to which he could direct them.

It may not seem as though Lucretius belonged among the friends of old Roman religion, and as though the De Rerum Natura were exactly a religious poem, and yet his work was in so far helpful to old Roman religion in that it attacked the excesses of a latter-day superstition which had alienated the hearts of the people from their old beliefs.

Natura was so thunderstruck at the appearance of his father, and the manner in which he accosted him, that he was far from being able to speak one word, but threw himself at his feet, with a look which testified nothing but confusion: that action, however, denoting that he had not altogether forgot himself, melted the father's heart; he raised him, and forcing him to sit down in a chair close by him; 'Well, Natura, said he, 'you have been disobedient to an excess; I wish it were possible for your distresses to have given you a remorse in proportion; I am still a father, if you can be a son. He would have proceeded, but was not able: the meagre aspect, dejected air, and wretched appearance of a son so dear to him, threw him into a condition which destroyed all the power of maintaining that reserve which he thought necessary to his character.

Aaron, who was just surveying the Frutte, which consisted of two rather old pomegranates and various pale yellow apples, with a sprinkling of withered dried figs. At the moment, they all looked like a Natura Morta arrangement. "But do you think I might ?" said Francis moodily. Angus pursed his lips with a reckless brightness. "Why not? I see no reason why you shouldn't," he said.