"Of course, dearest Marchesa. I understood that. But it is most kind of you to tell me about the details. In Beatrice's interest and her interests will of course be my first concern in life " "Of course, carissimo," said the Marchesa, interrupting him. "Can I doubt it?

"Fie," said Violante, with arch reproach, for she knew her father's humours too well to interpret his horrible sentiments literally, "fie on your consistency, Padre Carissimo. Do you not trust your secret to me?" "You! A kitten is not a cat, and a girl is not a woman. Besides, the secret was already known to you, and I had no choice. Peace, Jemima will stay here for the present.

'Mon cher Giacometto', writes one woman, in French; 'Carissimo a Amatissimo', writes another, in Italian. These letters from women are in some confusion, and are in need of a good deal of sorting over and rearranging before their full extent can be realised.

If I was to lose five thousand francs, they at least should not be left free to pursue their evil ways. I would communicate with the police; the police should meet the miscreants at the corner of the Rue Guénégaud. Carissimo would die; his lovely mistress would be brokenhearted.

Inside I found a cocuyo; and, using it as I had been already instructed, I read: "The walls are adobe. You have a knife. The side with the loop-hole fronts outward. There is a field of magueys, and beyond this you will find the forest. You may then trust to yourselves. I can help you no farther. Carissimo caballero, adios!"

"Fie," said Violante, with arch reproach, for she knew her father's humours too well to interpret his horrible sentiments literally, "fie on your consistency, Padre Carissimo. Do you not trust your secret to me?" "You! A kitten is not a cat, and a girl is not a woman. Besides, the secret was already known to you, and I had no choice. Peace, Jemima will stay here for the present.

I could see that they were still under the belief that my excitement was due to over-indulgence in alcoholic liquor, whilst Madame the proprietress called me an abominable liar for daring to suggest that she harboured thieves within her doors. Then suddenly, as if in vindication of my character, there came from a floor above the sound of a loud, shrill bark. "Carissimo!" I cried triumphantly.

Carissimo was restored to the arms of his loving mistress, but the reward for his recovery had to be shared between the police and myself: three thousand francs going to the police who apprehended the thief, and two thousand to me who had put them on the track. It was not a fortune, Sir, but I had to be satisfied.

Some of the photographs of the reliquaries were not quite successful, and the next year we returned to make others, taking with us some copies which we had promised to send to the bishop. I was rather amused to be greeted effusively as "Carissimo"; it was such a contrast to our first reception.

"Bertie, carissimo," it began, "I wonder if you will have the nerve to do it: it will take some nerve, too. Don't forget the jewels. They are a detail, but details interest me. "Yours as ever, Clotilde." "Your mother must not know of my existence. If questioned swear you never heard of me." For years Mrs.