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He was not a man of talk, and the tears had washed the soot from his face in two white furrows. "Ye'll hae a waught wi' me afore ye gang, John," he said clumsily, "for th' morns we've paddl' 't thegither i' th' Nith." The ale was brought by the guidwife, who paused, as she put it down, to wipe her eyes with her apron.

We twa hae paidl't i' the burn, Frae mornin' sun til dine:* But seas between us braid hae roar'd, Sin auld lang syne. For auld lang syne, etc. And here's a hand, my trusty fiere, And gie's a hand o' thine; And we'll tak a right guid-willie waught, * For auld lang syne. For auld lang syne, etc.

He was not a man of talk, and the tears had washed the soot from his face in two white furrows. "Ye'll hae a waught wi' me afore ye gang, John," he said clumsily, "for th' morns we've paddl' 't thegither i' th' Nith." The ale was brought by the guidwife, who paused, as she put it down, to wipe her eyes with her apron.

He was not a man of talk, and the tears had washed the soot from his face in two white furrows. "Ye'll hae a waught wi' me afore ye gang, John," he said clumsily, "for th' morns we've paddl' 't thegither i' th' Nith." The ale was brought by the guidwife, who paused, as she put it down, to wipe her eyes with her apron.

But in nae event cry on me, for I am wearied wi' doudling the bag o' wind a' day, and I am gaun to eat my dinner quietly in the spence. And if ye ken ony puir body o' our acquaintance that's blate for want o' siller, and has far to gang hame, ye needna stick to gie them a waught o' drink and a bannock we'll ne'er miss't, and it looks creditable in a house like ours.

He was a queer fellow, and had a coothy way of getting in about folk, the which was very serviceable to him in his vocation; nor was he overly gleg: but when a job was ill done, and he was obliged to notice it, he would often break out on the smugglers for being so stupid, so that for an exciseman he was wonderful well liked, and did not object to a waught of brandy at a time; when the auld wives ca'd it well- water.

But in nae event cry on me, for I am wearied wi' doudling the bag o' wind a' day, and I am gaun to eat my dinner quietly in the spence. And if ye ken ony puir body o' our acquaintance that's blate for want o' siller, and has far to gang hame, ye needna stick to gie them a waught o' drink and a bannock we'll ne'er miss't, and it looks creditable in a house like ours.

"'Deed," replied my grandfather, "it's very alarming; Lucky, here, has just been telling me that there's likely to be a straemash among the Reformers. Surely they'll ne'er daur to rebel." "If a' tales be true, that's no to do," said the smith, blowing the froth from the cap in which Dame Lugton handed him the ale, and taking a right good-willy waught.

"Did YE never hear the auld saw, Grizzie," he said: "Throu the heather an' how gaed the creepin' thing, But abune was the waught o' an angel's wing ?" "Ay, I hae h'ard it naegait 'cep' here i' this hoose," answered Grizzie: she would disparage the authority of the saying by a doubt as to its genuineness. "But, sir, ye sud never temp' providence. Wha kens what may be oot i' the nicht?"

Micawber's spirits becoming elevated, too, we sang 'Auld Lang Syne'. When we came to 'Here's a hand, my trusty frere', we all joined hands round the table; and when we declared we would 'take a right gude Willie Waught', and hadn't the least idea what it meant, we were really affected. In a word, I never saw anybody so thoroughly jovial as Mr.