"Vos, O clarissima mundi Lumina, labentem coelo quae ducitis annum, Liber, et alma Ceres; vestro si munere tellus Chaoniam pingui glandem mutavit arista, Poculaqu' inventis Acheloia miscuit uvis, Munera vestra cano."

With her and Sister Theresa, the priest proposed next day to leave Carlisle, for the nearest seaport from which they could embark for France. 'FUNGARQUE INANI MUNERE, he repeated, as the ecclesiastic retired. 'Yet why not class these acts of remembrance with other honours, with which affection, in all sects, pursues the memory of the dead?

NAM DUM SUMUS etc.: the whole of this doctrine is Platonic; cf. Lael. 13. MUNERE NECESSITATIS ET ... OPERE: 'function and task allotted as by fate'. IMMORTALIS: Cicero rarely mentions the gods without this epithet. SPARSISSE: Horace calls the soul divinae particulam aurae. TUERENTUR: rule, or guard, or care for.

With her and sister Theresa the priest proposed next day to leave Carlisle for the nearest seaport from which they could embark for France. 'Fun-garque inani munere, he repeated, as the ecclesiastic retired. 'Yet why not class these acts of remembrance with other honours, with which affection in all sects pursues the memory of the dead?

In the last picture is Ranuccio Farnese, chosen by Eugenius III as General of the Church, with this inscription: RANUTIUS FARNESIUS, PAULI TERTII PAPÆ AVUS, EUGENIO TERTIO P.M. ROSÆ AUREÆ MUNERE INSIGNITUS, PONTIFICII EXERCITUS IMPERATOR CONSTITUITUR, ANNO CHRISTI 1435.

Ulpian in Dig., 24, 1, 1: Moribus apud nos receptum est, ne inter virum et uxorem donationes valerent, hoc autem receptum est, ne mutuo amore invicem spoliarentur, donationibus non temperantes, sed profusa erga se facilitate. Paulus in Dig., 24, 1, 14. Gaius in Dig., 24, 1, 42; ibid., Licinius Rufus, 41; Ulpian, Tit. vii, 1. Martial, vii, 64 et post hoc dominae munere factus eques.

BREVE TEMPUS etc.: one of the poets has said that 'in small measures lives may perfect be'. Cf. also Tusc. 1, 109 nemo parum diu vixit qui virtutis perfectae perfecto functus est munere; Seneca, Ep. 77 quo modo fabula, sic vita: non quam diu, sed quam bene acta sit refert.

Manibus date lilia plenis . . . His saltem accumulem donis et fungar inani Munere, rang in his ears, and he thought that he too must bring a gift and scatter lilies on her grave; handfuls of lilies; but they must be unfading flowers, wet with immortal tears. He pondered on this gift. It must be a gift of song, a temple built in verse. But he was still unsatisfied.

MUNERE ... UTERETUR: 'a gift such as we both might make use of in company'. MIHI QUIDEM: this forms a correction upon uterque nostrum above: 'whatever you may think of the work, I at least have found the writing of it pleasant'. CONFECTIO: 'composition'; 'completion'; a word scarcely found in the classical Latin except in Cicero's writings. Cf. De Or. 2, 52 annalium confectio; pro.

With her and sister Theresa the priest proposed next day to leave Carlisle for the nearest seaport from which they could embark for France. 'Fun-garque inani munere, he repeated, as the ecclesiastic retired. 'Yet why not class these acts of remembrance with other honours, with which affection in all sects pursues the memory of the dead?