This Mattie, who remembered where she had seen both Helen and Katy, pointed out to the excited woman gazing about her in a maze of bewilderment, and half doubting her own identity with the Betsy Barlow who, six weeks before, if charged with such a sin as she was now committing, would have exclaimed, "Is thy servant a dog to do this thing?"

She told of Mattie and how they had helped her, and of her Uncle John; of Patty and Judge Sands; and lastly of Kate and what a wonderful character she was. "Wait, dear, I want to show you my ceremonial gown," and she quickly slipped it on. The girl's hair was still hanging unbound, having slept in it that way, and she hooked about it her coronation band.

Mattie went in with the doctor, while Allen looked after both horses. They found Chapman attending Wallace, who lay in a dazed quiet conscious, but not definitely aware of material things. The doctor looked his patient over carefully. Then he asked, "Who is the yoong mon?" "He's been teaching here, or, rather, preaching." "When did this coom on?" "Last night.

He's a bad man, Bill, and Mattie can't abide him. If you tell him where she is, she'll never speak to you again. Mat. Oh, Susan! what shall I do? Don't bring him here, Bill. I shall have to run away again; and I can't, for we owe a week's rent. Sus. There, Bill! Bill. Don't you be afeard, Mattie. He shan't touch you. Nor the old one neither. Mat.

A sudden moisture gathered in her eyes as she said, "You're too good and honest and generous a man to distrust anybody: that's what I think, Will." "Mattie, I wish you wouldn't talk like that," said he, in an injured voice. "It ain't hardly respectable." After which there was a silence for a short time.

You'll find her in the house." Bott went to the house, leaving Saul pondering. Girls were queer cattle. Had Mattie given her word to this slab-sided, lanky fellow? Had she given Sam Sleeny the mitten for him? Perhaps she wanted the glory of being Mrs. Professor Bott. Well, she could do as she liked; but Saul swore softly to himself, "If Bott comes to live offen me, he's got to pay his board."

Miss Mattie shuffled back into the kitchen. During the Winter she wore black knitted slippers attached to woollen inner soles which had no heels. She was well past the half-century mark, but her face had few lines in it and her grey eyes were sharp and penetrating. Her smooth, pale brown hair, which did not show the grey in it, was parted precisely in the middle.

Mattie went in with the doctor, while Allen looked after both horses. They found Chapman attending Wallace who lay in a dazed quiet conscious, but not definitely aware of material things. The doctor looked his patient over carefully. Then he asked, "Who is the yoong mon?" "He's been teaching here, or rather preaching." "When did this coom on?" "Last night.

There came a little laugh from Aunt Mattie in her corner at the writing-table. 'Things need to be pretty strong at Moor Edge, she said. 'Yes, said Uncle Ted, 'the young men there do a good deal of knocking about, I fancy. How did you get on with them, my little Rose? You are not accustomed to racketty boys. I hope they didn't startle you? Rosamond's quiet little face grew rather pink.

"Why, Mattie, the house is afire!" said Patty Sands. "Let's get out quickly." They opened the hall door, closing it tightly after them. They had far better have stayed in the apartment and have descended by the fire escape, but they thought of it too late. The hall door had locked behind them. The outer halls were black with smoke. People were rushing wildly up and down.