'Comfortable here! he echoed me, disconsolately, and glanced at the heath, the tent, the black circle of the broth-pot, and the wild girl. Kiomi's mother was seen in a turn of the gravel-cutting, bearing purchases from Durstan village.

My walks and rides were divided between the road he must have followed toward London, bearing me in his arms, and the vacant place of Kiomi's camp. Kiomi stood for freedom, pointing into the darkness I wished to penetrate that I might find him. If I spoke of him to my aunt she trembled.

Outside, in the A cutting of the tent's threshold, a heavy-coloured sunset hung upon dark land. My pillow meantime lifted me gently at a regular measure, and it was with untroubled wonder that I came to the knowledge of a human heart beating within it. So soft could only be feminine; so firm still young. The bosom was Kiomi's.

A small child would not have sulked as I did at Kiomi's behaviour; but I met my grandfather's ridiculous politeness with a man's indifference. 'So you're back, sir, are you! 'I am, sir. 'Ran like a hare, 'stead of a fox, eh? 'I didn't run like either, sir. 'Do you ride? 'Yes, sir; a horse. That was his greeting and how I took it. I had not run away from him, so I had a quiet conscience.

'Comfortable here! he echoed me, disconsolately, and glanced at the heath, the tent, the black circle of the broth-pot, and the wild girl. Kiomi's mother was seen in a turn of the gravel-cutting, bearing purchases from Durstan village.

The money remaining in my pocket amounted to five shillings and a penny. I offered it to Kiomi's mother, who refused to accept it; so did the father, and Osric also. I might think of them, they observed, on my return to my own house: they pointed at Riversley. 'No, said I, 'I shan't go there, you may be sure. The women grinned, and the men yawned.

Her eager brown eyes devoured me while I stood panting to be happy, if only I might fling my money at Kiomi's feet, and tell her, 'There, take all I have; I hate you! One minute I was curiously perusing the soft shade of a moustache on my aunt's upper lip; the next, we jumped into the carriage, and she was my dear aunt Dorothy again, and the world began rolling another way.

A girl sidled at the opening of the tent, peeping in, and from a mufed rattle of subpectoral thunder discharged at her in quick heated snaps, I knew Kiomi's voice. After an altercation of their monotonous gipsy undertones, the girl dropped and crouched outside. It was morning when I woke next, stronger, and aching worse.

He said something to Janet that betrayed him, for she had not seen him since. 'How betrayed him? said I. 'Why, said Temple, 'of course it was Heriot who put Edbury in Kiomi's hands. Edbury wouldn't have known of Mabel's sailing, or known the vessel she was in, without her help.

I walked over Kiomi's heath till dark, when one of our grooms on horseback overtook me, saying that the squire begged me to jump on the horse and ride home as quick as possible. Two other lads and the coachman were out scouring the country to find me, and the squire was anxious, it appeared.