"Well," remarked the youth, "like as not this story'll turn out jest like them others did." "Not much it won't," replied the tall soldier, exasperated. "Not much it won't. Didn't the cavalry all start this morning?" He glared about him. No one denied his statement. "The cavalry started this morning," he continued. "They say there ain't hardly any cavalry left in camp.

I'm going to take this thing to my quarters. The story'll be, he was getting into my window when I waked up and nabbed him." "Oh!" exclaimed Angela, roused to understanding and appreciation. "For me, that would be good but for you " "For me, it's all right, too. And you don't come on in this act, lady." "He'll tell," she said. "I guess not.

But I've got the straight tip, and I know what I am talking about. I thought, possibly, you might wish to say a few words in explanation just to tone the thing down, to give it the mark of authenticity, you know. I thought you'd like to be quoted, and to know, from me, that the story'll be all right. On the level, now, isn't that better?" Duncan laughed. He did not in the least understand.

"Just leave us alone and I'll manage it somehow." It proved that Miss Eyester was not over-sanguine for, finally, with the aid of divers tools and implements, Pinkey was able to spit out the last particle of the plaster of Paris. "I s'pose the story'll go all over the country and make me ridic'lous," he said, gloomily.

"Please promise this, Miss Doane. You must make an example, or you'll have every confidence man in town working you. Will you do it, no matter what or who it is? If you are asked for money, and you don't know the man, have him locked up, and the story'll get around, and you won't be bothered any more." "Well, if you think it necessary " "It is most necessary. You will promise?"

"Well," remarked the youth, "like as not this story'll turn out jest like them others did." "Not much it won't," replied the tall soldier, exasperated. "Not much it won't. Didn't the cavalry all start this morning?" He glared about him. No one denied his statement. "The cavalry started this morning," he continued. "They say there ain't hardly any cavalry left in camp.

Once he No matter. That story'll keep. Lady Gray is calling us." They had lingered to inspect some of the ranchmen's belongings, as they passed from room to room, Lady Gray and the girls going forward in Lemuel's company. She was beckoning her son and asked, as he came running up: "Please go across the lawn and ask Miss Milliken to join us.

I guess this ain't over 'n' above interestin' to ye, is it?" he asked after a pause, looking doubtfully at his sister. "Yes, 'tis," she asserted. "I'm lookin' forrered to where the deakin comes in, but you jest tell it your own way." "I'll git there all in good time," said David, "but some of the point of the story'll be lost if I don't tell ye what come fust."

Again he paused, looking up timidly at the mass of golden hair which was gently trembling as the girl's emotions chased one another through her heart and being; he saw that, and beyond it, just over it, the still, white features of the dead man's face and he lowered his glance again. "Maybe my story'll help you, miss, for no one's ever heard it yet. I could only tell it to you, and here now.

"Your story'll be on the street in Western City in a little over an hour; it'll be down here as soon thereafter as they can get telephone connections. And take my advice, if you want to keep a whole skin, you'll be out of Pedro when that happens!" When Hal spoke, he did not answer Billy Keating's last remark.