When I returned the duchess had gone, and Gustave had, half-ironically, consoled my evident annoyance by telling me that he had given such a description of me to his friend that she shared my sorrow, and had left a polite message to that effect. That I was not much consoled needs no saying.

Or, in other words, that those who are the real disciples of Christ, cannot fail to be truly polite. Thus, let the young woman who would possess genuine politeness, take her lessons, not in the school of a hollow, heartless world, but in the school of Jesus Christ.

I began to be frightened; but I was more afraid to confess that I was an impostor, for I am sure the master of the transport alone would have kicked me overboard, if I had let him know that he had been so confounded polite to a ship's boy.

The distance, however, would render it so inconvenient to my counsel to visit me, that I should prefer to remain where I am; yet the rooms proposed are said to be airy and healthy." July 3, 1807. "I have three rooms in the third story of the penitentiary, making an extent of one hundred feet. My jailer is quite a polite and civil man altogether unlike the idea one would form of a jailer.

His manners were oppressively polite; and his sense of his own importance was not sufficiently influenced by diplomatic reserve. My colleague, the first secretary, was a far more interesting person. Bright, unaffected, and agreeable, he at once interested me when we were introduced to each other. I pay myself a compliment, as I consider, when I add that he became my firm and true friend.

Every one was in good humor, many polite assurances of appreciation and good will were exchanged on both sides, and for a while it seemed as though harmony might be restored among the leaders. But this pleasant state of affairs was of short duration.

They were polite always. It was like being stuffed with too much honey. And I don't mean Ourïeda, of course. Ourïeda's a darling. I'd do anything for her. I've proved that! Did my father give you any idea why he had to send for me in a hurry, though he has to leave me alone or rather in charge of people I don't know at Bel-Abbés? He must have told you something, as he asked such a sacrifice."

Poor Rattazzi was there too. He was not a striking-looking man, but agreeable and excessively polite. He rarely talked politics I rather suspect from the fear of compromising himself but his conversation was was pleasant and varied.

Then, perceiving that she had not been altogether polite: "Aren't you nearly frozen?" she asked. "No, it's very snug in here. Some other tramp must have been here before me, and got these leaves together. There's lots of warmth in them."

"If a man tells you he's a gentleman you can bet your boots he isn't," he retorted. "Am I a gentleman?" Philip's truthfulness made it difficult for him to answer, but he was naturally polite. "Oh, well, you're different," he said. "You're American, aren't you?" "I suppose we may take it that only Englishmen are gentlemen," said Weeks gravely. Philip did not contradict him.