She has gone to my Uncle Toussaint's in the Rue Marcadet; and she can't stop much longer, for she's been away more than an hour." Thereupon Celine cleared one of the chairs on which lay a handful of scraps of wood, picked up on some waste ground. The bare and fireless room was assuredly also a breadless one.

There they were houseless and breadless the two fugitives, in the heart of that beautiful forest which has rung to the horns of many a royal chase.

She has gone to my Uncle Toussaint's in the Rue Marcadet; and she can't stop much longer, for she's been away more than an hour." Thereupon Celine cleared one of the chairs on which lay a handful of scraps of wood, picked up on some waste ground. The bare and fireless room was assuredly also a breadless one.

In Rome the destitution was certainly more complete, the food more loathsome, the dirt more repulsive. Yet at the same time the Roman poor retained more ease of manner and more real gaiety. The young priest thought of the fireless, breadless poor of Paris, shivering in their hovels at winter time; and suddenly he understood. The destitution of Rome did not know cold.

They may, through the influence of their parents, still care for the things which you call the breadless arts," said the lady with a sigh. "But I shall make my children acquainted with your ideas and I shall try to speak to them according to your views, at least as far as I am able." "How old is the eldest? She ought to be old enough to understand my reasons," remarked the gentleman.

Forbear, O troubles of the world, * And pardon an ye nill forbear: I went to seek my daily bread * I find that breadless I must fare: For neither handcraft brings me aught * Nor Fate allots to me a share: How many fools the Pleiads reach * While darkness whelms the wise and ware.

A man, homeless, shelterless, breadless, friendless, and moneyless, is not in a condition to assume a very proud or joyous tone; and in just this condition was I, while wandering about the streets of New York city and lodging, at least one night, among the barrels on one of its wharves. I was not only free from slavery, but I was free from home, as well.

The rest were made up of unfortunate women of the vilest and most ragged description, aged itinerants, with features seared with famine, bleared eyes, dropping jaws, shivering limbs, and all the mortal signs of hopeless and aidless, and, worst of all, breadless infirmity.

Encouraged by their accomplice night, all the mire and woe of Paris had returned to the surface. The empty roadway now belonged to the breadless, homeless starvelings, those for whom there was no place in the sunlight, the vague, swarming, despairing herd which is only espied at night-time. Ah! what spectres of destitution, what apparitions of grief and fright there were!

When you would ask others to support a career of blind and selfish extravagance, pause and think over the breadless lips this wasted gold would have fed! the joyless hearts it would have comforted! You talk of repaying me: if the occasion offer, do so; if not if we never meet again, and you have it in your power, pay it for me to the Poor! And now, farewell."