Capitolinus says that, while the guests feasted, sometimes the magnificent Verus got drunk, and was carried to bed in a coverlid, or else, the red feather aiding, turned out and fought the watch. It was this splendid individual to whom Marcus Aurelius entrusted the Euphrates.

Am I right Macedonian citizens, or am I wrong?" A murmur of assent was heard which became a roar of laughter when Verus, after Hadrian had got away, went on: "He has a beard like Caesar, and so he behaves as if he wore the purple! You did well to let him escape, his wife and children are waiting for him over their porridge."

Am I right Macedonian citizens, or am I wrong?" A murmur of assent was heard which became a roar of laughter when Verus, after Hadrian had got away, went on: "He has a beard like Caesar, and so he behaves as if he wore the purple! You did well to let him escape, his wife and children are waiting for him over their porridge."

"I will not take any orders; I shall go to Lochias." "To see Antinous in the flames! such a sight is not to be seen every day, to be sure!" cried Verus, ironically, as he sprang into his chariot, and took the reins into his own hand. Balbilla stamped with rage. She went to Sabina's rooms fully resolved to go to the scene of the fire.

Verus, co-emperor by a certain too generous unwisdom that remains a kind of admirable fly in the ointment of the character of Aurelius, shows his mettle against the Parthians, taking his command as a chance for having a luxurious fling beyond the reach and supervision of his severe colleague; and things would go ill indeed in the East but for Avidius Cassius, Verus' second in command.

"Already!" said the boy; and as he reflected how soon that must be done which Verus had required of him, and then looked up again at the heavens, it seemed to him as though all the stars in the blue vault over his head had glided from their places and were dancing in wild and whirling confusion between the sky and the sea.

The roof, thatched with palm-leaves and reeds, had begun to crackle when Antinous rushed into the tower only a few paces off crying: "Fire fire!" and up the stairs which led to the observatory of the imperial stargazer. The entertainment which Verus was giving on the eve of his birthday seemed to be far from drawing to an end, even at the beginning of the third hour of the morning.

And he himself? He was the same to-day as ten years since: different every day and at every hour of the day. When Verus entered the palace Hadrian had returned thither but a few minutes previously from the city. The praetor was conducted through the reception-rooms to the private apartments, and here he had not long to wait, for Hadrian wished to speak with him immediately.

"For my part I certainly will not. Caesar will be in no danger?" "Hardly the old stones cannot burn." "Only look! how splendid! the sky is one crimson tent. I entreat you, Verus, let me go with you." "No, no, pretty one. Men are wanted down there." "How unkind you are." "At last! here are the chariots! You women stay here; do you understand me?"

"You are my friend, Verus, truly my friend; yes, I am sure of it," she said at last, breaking the silence. "Oh Sabina, my Mother!" he answered tenderly. "You spoiled me with kindness even when I was a boy, and what can I do to thank you for all this?" "Be always the same to me that you are to-day. Will you always for all time be the same, whatever your fortunes may be?"