'Such hazardous situations, says the captain, 'are the unavoidable companions of the man who goes upon a voyage of discovery. During our commander's expedition to Hapaee, he was introduced to Poulaho, the real king of the Friendly Isles; in whose presence it instantly appeared how groundless had been Feenou's pretensions to that character.

My first determination was to seek a supply of breadfruit and water at Tofoa, and afterwards to sail for Tongataboo, and there risk a solicitation to Poulaho, the king, to equip our boat, and grant us a supply of water and provisions, so as to enable us to reach the East Indies.

It appeared, indeed, that he declined to eat and drink in the royal presence, though there were persons of much inferior rank who did so. At the request of Poulaho the captain paid a visit to Tongataboo, where the ships were in considerable danger of driving on a low, sandy island, but escaped. At Tongataboo the English were entertained much in the same way that they had been at Hapaee.

Treacherous Attack of the Natives. Escape to Sea and bear away for New Holland. April. My first determination was to seek a supply of breadfruit and water at Tofoa, and afterwards to sail for Tongataboo, and there risk a solicitation to Poulaho the king to equip our boat and grant us a supply of water and provisions, so as to enable us to reach the East Indies.

The chiefs asked me if I would not stay with them all night. I said "No, I never sleep out of my boat; but in the morning we will again trade with you, and I shall remain till the weather is moderate, that we may go, as we have agreed, to see Poulaho, at Tongataboo." Macca-ackavow then got up and said, "You will not sleep on shore, then, Mattie?"

It was a happy circumstance, with respect to this transaction, that it did not abate the future confidence of Poulaho and his friends in the captain's kind and generous treatment. On the 5th of July was an eclipse of the sun, which, however, in consequence of unfavourable weather, was very imperfectly observed.

The chiefs asked me if I would not stay with them all night. I said: "No, I never sleep out of my boat; but in the morning we will again trade with you, and I shall remain till the weather is moderate that we may go, as we have agreed, to see Poulaho at Tongataboo." The onset was now preparing; everyone as I have described before kept knocking stones together, and Eefow quitted me.

Tepa having formerly been accustomed to our manner of speaking their language I found I could converse with him tolerably well. He informed me that Poulaho, Feenow, and Tubow, were alive and at Tongataboo, and that they would come hither as soon as they heard of our arrival, of which he promised to send them immediate notice.

King Poulaho warmly pressed his guests to remain, that they might witness a funeral ceremony, which was to take place the next day. During their stay in the island they had suffered from a succession of violent storms.

Feenou, however, was a chief of great note and influence. By Poulaho Captain Cook was invited to pass over to Tongataboo, which request he complied with after he had touched, for two or three days, at Annamooka. In the passage, the Resolution was insensibly drawn upon a large flat, on which lay innumerable coral rocks of different depths below the surface of the water.