Author of "The Texan" When Tex Benton said he'd do a thing, he did it, as readers of "The Texan" will affirm. So when, after a year of drought, he announced his purpose of going to town to get thoroughly "lickered up," unsuspecting Timber City was elected as the stage for a most thorough and sensational orgy.

She looks at him, and she sees he don't really know where I come from. Old Hank mostly was truthful when lickered up, fur that matter, and she knowed it, fur he couldn't think up no lies excepting a gineral denial when intoxicated up to the gills. Elmira looks into the basket.

But Hank, he always thought he had been baptized reg'lar. And he never was the same afterward. He had made his life-long brags, and his pride was broke in that there one pertic'ler spot. And he sorrered and grieved over it a good 'eal, and got grouchier and grouchier and meaner and meaner, and lickered oftener, if anything. Signing the pledge couldn't hold Hank.

For I kin swear that when that there young woman was sailin' outer the Golden Gate, Spencer Tucker was in my bar-room; I kin swear that I fed him, lickered him, give him a hoss and set him in his road to Monterey that very night." "Then, where is he now?" said Mrs. Tucker, suddenly facing them. They looked at each other, and then looked at Mrs. Tucker.

For I kin swear that when that there young woman was sailin' outer the Golden Gate, Spencer Tucker was in my bar room; I kin swear that I fed him, lickered him, give him a hoss and set him in his road to Monterey that very night." "Then, where is he now?" said Mrs. Tucker, suddenly facing them. They looked at each other, and then looked at Mrs. Tucker.

"He sure is a rantankerous cuss when he's lickered up. He'd jest as soon ride his horse through that door as he would to walk through, an' he's always puttin' somethin' over on someone. But he's a man. He'd go through hell an' high water fer a friend.

And Old Tom, the boy explained, was pretty likely to be "lickered up fer quite a spell" after such a session which invariably began with an exploration of the battered tin box. The boy told Caleb of days and nights on the trail boasted unconsciously of Old Tom's super-cunning with trap and deadfall, and even poison bait.

An' you know how bad I am when I get lickered up." "Blink, you're not going to drink, unless in that one deal I hinted about," said Pan meaningly. "Hope we can avoid it." "Aw, we're turnin' over a new leaf, huh?" queried the cowboy in strangest voice. "You are, Blink," replied Pan with a frank, serious smile. "I've been a respectable sober cowboy for some time. You've been terrible bad.