You either appreciate it absolutely or you do not; if you do, well and good; you may then write a prose poem about it, if you desire, and so communicate some of your feeling for it to another person; if you do not appreciate it, no one can blame you or quarrel with you; all that any one can do is to invite you to read again, and, perhaps through his eloquence, seek to inspire you with his own enthusiasm.

One of Warburton's suggestions to the South Australian Government was to explore the interior-which had proved such a difficult nut to crack by means of the POLICE. One has to know the country well to fully appreciate the exquisite humour of this suggestion.

I fancied I should have forgotten old associations should have grown out of sympathy with them; but I seem only to have learned to appreciate them more. Our memory for some things is better than we would believe." "There are two memories in us," I remarked; "the memory of the heart and the memory of the head. The former never is lost, though the other may be.

How it filled one's lungs and brought with it life, courage and confidence! One had to live in a hole in a hill before he could appreciate fully the blessed winds that blew about the world. He knew that the path ran in front of other hollows dug in the earth, and he felt sorry for the people who were compelled to burrow in them.

I have sometimes thought that people who have this rare privilege do not appreciate it as they should. It is such a rest and relief to get away from crowds of people, and handshaking, and travelling, to get home, even if it be for but a very brief while.

How can you say I do not love you when my soul is like a raging fire?" She shook her head slowly. "Your voice don't feel like it," she said. "What is it? What are you going to say?" He sighed and looked away from her with an irritated expression. "Little stupid!" he muttered she didn't appreciate him and he was a fool to expect it.

Can we conceive of any creature's being truly happy outside of what belongs to its own peculiar nature? And if we would have a man exempt from all human misfortunes, would it not estrange him from humanity? Undoubtedly it would; for we are so constituted that to appreciate great good fortune we must be acquainted with slight misfortunes.

"Jolly sun, jolly sea, jolly everything, isn't it?" "Rather. Even a landlubber like me can appreciate it. But you don't often have it like this, I bet." "Oh, I don't know," Hilliard answered absently, and then, swinging round and facing his friend, he went on: "I say, Merriman, I've something to tell you that will interest you, but I'm afraid it won't please you." Merriman laughed contentedly.

In another moment Saniel would have turned his back on the man, but he was a witness whom it would be well to treat with caution. "I have nothing more to do here," he said, politely. "Permit me to retire, after having thanked you for your offer, whose kindness I appreciate." "Well," cried the prince, "since you will not risk your fate, let me do it for you. This money may be a fetich.

One of the adventures of travel consists, not so much in finding that popular sayings are false, as that they mean more than they say. We cannot appreciate the full force of the phrase until we have seen the fact. We make a picture of the things we do not know out of the things we know; and suppose the traveller's tale to mean no more abroad than it would at home.