'That must be Mihr-afrūz, he thought, 'she is indeed lovely. Just then one of the attendants came to the water's edge to fill a cup, and though the prince was in hiding, his face was reflected in the water.

'That, said the prince, 'you will see if you order to be brought here the negro who will be found beneath the throne of the princess. Messengers were forthwith despatched to the garden house, and after awhile they returned bringing a negro whom they had discovered in a secret chamber underneath the throne of Mihr-afruz, dressed in a dress of honour, and surrounded with luxury.

Mihr-afruz was brought before the king, and the prince said: 'This is the murderer of your sons; do with her as you will. The king fancied that the prince might care for the girl's beauty, and replied: 'You have humbled her; do with her as you will.

There were four other negroes at the place; three I killed and the fourth got away, and has taken refuge beneath the throne of Mihr-afrūz, daughter of King Quimūs. I took Gul back to my palace, and from that time till now I have treated her as a dog is treated, and I have cared for my dog as though it were my wife.

He received from the king everything that belonged to Mihr-afruz; her treasure of gold and silver; her costly stuffs and carpets; her household plenishing; her horses and camels; her servants and slaves. Then he returned to his camp and sent for Dil-aram, who came bringing her goods and chattels, her gold and her jewels.

'O wealth of my life and source of my joy! responded Dil-arām, 'I do not know what the rose did to the cypress; but so much I know that the person who told Mihr-afrūz about it is a negro whom she hides under her throne.

When all was ready, Prince Almās set out for home, taking with him Jamīla, and Dil-arām and Gul, daughter of Taram-tāq, and the wicked Mihr-afrūz, and all the belongings of the four, packed on horses and camels, and in carts without number. As he approached the borders of his father's country word of his coming went before him, and all the city came forth to give him welcome.

Mihr-afruz was told that one man more had staked his head on her question, and that this was one who said he knew the answer. At the request of the prince, all the officers and notables of the land were summoned to hear his reply to the princess. All assembled, and the king and his queen Gul-rakh, and the girl and the prince were there.

He went in and wandered about through all quarters, and through bazaars and lanes and squares, in the least knowing from whom he could ask information about the riddle of Mihr-afrūz. He spent seven days thinking it over in silence. From the first day of his coming he had made friends with a young cloth-merchant, and a great liking had sprung up between them.

When all was ready, Prince Almas set out for home, taking with him Jamila, and Dil-aram and Gul, daughter of Taram-taq, and the wicked Mihr-afruz, and all the belongings of the four, packed on horses and camels, and in carts without number. As he approached the borders of his father's country word of his coming went before him, and all the city came forth to give him welcome.