Lord Merton looked by no means delighted at this attack; which I believe she would not so readily have made, but to revenge his neglect of us. "Did you meet your brother, Lady Louisa?" said Mrs. Beaumont. "No, Ma'am. Is he rode out this morning?"

The old lady took a little spell of rest on a packing-case; then she gave me her umberella and valise to take back to quarters, and, rolling up her sleeves, made like she was going into the hospital again. I didn't know what to say, but I guess I looked it. "William," she said, with a glitter of her gold specs. "Ma'am," said I. "Those boys aren't getting proper CON-sideration," she said.

The head-clerk I saw was vexed at the sight of me he came out from behind his desk, and begged I would go up stairs to Mr. Baldwin, who wished to speak to me. I was shown up stairs to Mr. Baldwin, with whom I found a remarkably gentlemanlike foreign-looking man. "Yes, sir yes, ma'am Mr.

But I care most of all for his life, and now that will be safe for a long while. They never kill their prisoners, do they?" "No, ma'am, no. They behave very well to them; better, I'm afraid, than we do to ours. They treat them quite as guests, when they fall into good hands. Though Napoleon himself is not too mild in that way."

"Please ma'am, I came to tell you that I am very sorry I ran out of school without courtesying," said Ruby, rather shyly, looking at the beautiful white hair while she was speaking, and wondering if when she herself grew to be an old lady she would ever have such beautiful fluffy hair, and if she should wear a little white cap. "Why did you do so, Ruby?" asked Miss Chapman. Ruby hung her head.

"Now, my dears," she said, "you have been very quiet, and it is time to dress;" and she offered the maid's help to dress Lucy and Emily. "No, thank you, ma'am," said Lucy; "we have no one to wait upon us at home; we always dress each other." "I wish," said Miss Darwell, "that I had a little sister whom I might dress; but Mrs.

He has not been like the same man since he connected himself with the Greys so decidedly. Surely, ma'am, you must perceive that." "It had not occurred to me, my dear. He comes very often, and he is always extremely kind and very entertaining. He brought his bride with him yesterday, which I thought very attentive, as I could not go and pay my respects to her.

Norris continued, "It is quite delightful, ma'am, to see young people so properly happy, so well suited, and so much the thing! I cannot but think of dear Sir Thomas's delight. And what do you say, ma'am, to the chance of another match? Mr. Rushworth has set a good example, and such things are very catching." Mrs. Rushworth, who saw nothing but her son, was quite at a loss.

"Having his tea in the drawing-room, ma'am." "Oh!" She took off her fur coat and went quickly upstairs. She did not care about golf, and to-day the mere sound of the name irritated her. Englishmen were always playing golf, she said to herself. Jacques Sennier did not waste his time on such things, she was sure.

Und he don't say nothings, Teacher; no, ma'am; he don't say nothings, only he looks on me, und in his eyes stands tears. So that makes me better in mine heart, und I don't cries no more. I sets und looks on mine friend, und mine friend he sets und looks on me mit smilin' looks.