'Hello! said he. The Kanakas clapped hands and called upon him to go on. 'No, SIR! said the captain. 'No eat, no dance. Savvy? 'Poor old man! returned one of the crew. 'Him no eat? 'Lord, no! said the captain. 'Like-um too much eat. No got. 'All right. Me got, said the sailor; 'you tome here. Plenty toffee, plenty fei. Nutha man him tome too.

Years afterward, when I found old Noel's trap on Keeonekh's portage, I asked Simmo why no bait had been used. "No good use-um bait," he said, "Keeonekh like-um fresh fish, an' catch-um self all he want." And that is true. Except in starvation times, when even the pools are frozen, or the fish die from one of their mysterious epidemics, Keeonekh turns up his nose at any bait.

"Much like-um lot," remarked one of the natives, and his companion, added more concisely: "Same like-um lot." In spite of the fact that our party had been fearing some such information as this upon reaching Panama, the actual announcement of it made their hearts jump wildly. "Where is this machine now?" asked Mr. Giddings as calmly as he could. "In the hangar," was the reply of Masters.

"My peoples go now," he said. "Me like-um lifle." "When you go Kadiak?" asked Rob. "Maybe seven week, four week, ten nine week all light, all light, all light," said the chief, amiably. "You make-um talk-talk ting. Give me! You give-um lifle now." Rob turned to the other boys. "We'll hold a council," said he. "Now, what do you think is best to do?" The others remained silent for a time.

Rob shrugged his shoulder and pointed toward the mountains, as though he did not know where the refugee might be. After awhile the old native produced from under his coat three handsomely made kamelinkas, or rain-proof coats, made of membranes. He pointed to the clothing of the boys and made signs of rain. "You like-um?" he asked. "Me like-um lifle." Rob shook his head, but the old man persisted.

"Hello!" said he. The Kanakas clapped hands and called upon him to go on. "No, sir!" said the captain. "No eat, no dance. Savvy?" "Poor old man!" returned one of the crew. "Him no eat?" "Lord, no!" said the captain. "Like-um too much eat. No got." "All right. Me got," said the sailor; "you tome here. Plenty toffee, plenty fei. Nutha man him tome too."

"No lettum stranger lound," protested the fellow. "Him both flylers alla samee you. Like-um see, you see; like-um see, he see." "Oh, ginger!" exclaimed John, turning to his comrades, in clear disgust, "the stupid dunce thinks those fellows belong to us and we to them, just because we all wear the same sort of flying clothes! Did you ever see the like?" Paul now took up the questioning.