"True for ye; but as we've got to arn our brid be the sweat of our brows, we're in the fair way to fortin," said Ned O'Connor, blowing away energetically with the big bellows. Ned had been reappointed to this duty since the erection of the second forge, which was in Ruby's charge. It was our hero's hammer that created such a din up in the beacon, while Dove wrought down on the rock.

It wernd so often as aw'd a chance, bud whenever th' manager's back were turned, an' aw were alone, I were noan slow to tak' my chance. It were wheer I could just see Betty at her looms. Bless thee, lass, aw think aw can see thee naa, bendin' o'er thi looms wi' a neck as praad as a swan's, thi fingers almost as nimble as th' shuttle, an' that voice o' thine treblin' like a brid!

As he stepped out of the waters a cloud passed from before the October sun, and a flood of light poured through the open window above the baptistery, while a white dove from the neighbouring farm perched for a moment on the wooden sill. Then Milly once more turned to her father and said: 'Yon's th' brid, faither, but I don't yer th' voice! 'What voice? whispered Abraham Lord.

"True for ye; but as we've got to arn our brid be the sweat of our brows, we're in the fair way to fortin," said Ned O'Connor, blowing away energetically with the big bellows. Ned had been reappointed to this duty since the erection of the second forge, which was in Ruby's charge. It was our hero's hammer that created such a din up in the beacon, while Dove wrought down on the rock.

Then I coome across th' old flute, and it seemed to say, "I'll help thee agen." "Nay, owd brid," I said, "tha cornd. It's noan brass this time, it's mi lad." And th' owd flute seemed to say, "Try me." So I tuk it up, and put it to mi lips and blew yi, aat of a sad heart, Mr. Penrose but it wor reet. Th' owd flute gi' me back mi prayer grace for grace, as yo' parsons say, whatever yo' mean by't.

So it happend, that as thei wenten serchinge, toward the place that the emperour was, thei saughe an owle sittynge upon a tree aboven hym; and than thei seyden amonges hem, that there was no man, be cause that thei saughe that brid there: and to thei wenten hire wey; and thus escaped the emperour from dethe.

He ascended the wooden stairs, and in a dingy room with one desk and chair found his former aid. "Well, what the hill is this, Hennesey tryin' to take the brid out of honest min's mouths?" "I've me livin' to make, Murphy, an' I'm a-doin' it. I got the crew of the Albatross." "An' what did ye do wid 'em?" "Put 'em wid Stillman, over beyant. Ye might ha' had 'em had ye played fair."

I believe it would be impossible to imagine two worse plays; but, as Brid Oison says, 'These are things that one admits only to himself'; it is always disagreeable to be informed of one's stupidity by an ignorant audience that shouts after you like a pack of hounds after a hare.

I have heard their communings so often tauld ower that I almost think I was there mysell, though I couldna be born at the time. "I wuss ye joy, sir, of the head seat and the white loaf and the brid lairdship.

I believe it would be impossible to imagine two worse plays; but, as Brid Oison says, 'These are things that one admits only to himself'; it is always disagreeable to be informed of one's stupidity by an ignorant audience that shouts after you like a pack of hounds after a hare.