"I mean all Blaisdells, wherever I find them," smiled Mr. Smith. "Dear me! What, US? You mean WE'll be in the book?" Now that the matter of board had been satisfactorily settled, Mrs. Blaisdell apparently dared to show some interest in the book. "Certainly." "You don't say! My, how pleased Hattie'll be my sister-in-law, Jim's wife.

It was in February that a certain metropolitan reporter, short for feature articles, ran up to Hillerton and contributed to his paper, the following Sunday, a write-up on "The Blaisdells One Year After," enlarging on the fine new homes, the motor cars, and the luxurious living of the three families.

The general opinion seemed to be that the man was dead; though a few admitted that there was a possibility, of course, that he was merely lost somewhere in darkest South America and would eventually get back to civilization, certainly long before the time came to open the second letter of instructions. Smith enjoyed greatly. Then, too, there were the Blaisdells themselves.

I told the tailor the circumstances; I did not like to let him to know that I had then about seven hundred dollars in my pocket; I wished to appear poor as long as there was a chance to collect any of my Meredith and Lake Village bills; so I offered him three dollars to take back the coat. He willingly consented and that was the last of the "Blossom" business with the Blaisdells.

Miss Flora, on her way home, stopped at the Duff cottage and reproached Miss Maggie for the delinquency. "Nonsense! Why should I go?" laughed Miss Maggie. "Why SHOULDN'T you?" retorted Miss Flora. "All the rest of us did, 'most." "Well, that's all right. You're Blaisdells but I'm not, you know." "You're just as good as one, Maggie Duff!

Everything's 'plebeian' with Bess now. Oh we're havin' great times at our house since Bess ELIZABETH came!" grinned Benny, tossing his cap in the air, and dancing down the walk much as he had danced the first night Mr. Smith saw him a year before. The James Blaisdells were hardly off to shore and camp when Miss Flora started on her travels. Mr.

The lawyers were bland and courteous, but they really had nothing to say, they declared, beyond the already published facts. In Hillerton the Blaisdells accepted this notoriety with characteristic variation.

They may save a bit, here and there, but they do it where it doesn't show and nobody knows. Take the Blaisdells, for instance. When the Sodality Bank went up, and old Blaisdell died, everybody said the family was down and out. They must have lost millions. But did they move into 'apartments' and put up a placard, 'Home of the Dead-Brokes. Walk in and Sympathize? I guess they didn't!

Smith went. But, as had occurred once or twice before, Mr. Smith's face, as he followed her, was a study. Christmas saw many changes in the Blaisdell families. The James Blaisdells had moved into the big house near the Gaylord place. Mrs. Hattie had installed two maids in the kitchen, bought a handsome touring car, and engaged an imposing-looking chauffeur.

He heard the Blaisdells and their new wealth discussed from all viewpoints, and he heard some things about the missing millionaire benefactor that were particularly interesting to him.