"Miss Marchmont marries the Duke of Hyde, in three weeks, Baxter." "Indeed, sir!" "You were, I believe, aware of the fact that Miss Marchmont and I were as good as engaged?" "I had hem! gathered as much, sir." "Then confound it all, Baxter! why aren't you surprised?" "I am quite over-come, sir!" said Baxter, stooping to recover the salt-spoon which had slipped to the floor.

Tredgold played with a salt-spoon and frowned thoughtfully. "We've been looking round for a ship this morning," he said, slowly. "As passengers?" inquired the captain, staring. "As owners," put in Mr. Chalk. Captain Brisket, greatly interested, drew first his glass and then his chair a yard nearer. "Do you mean that you want to buy one?" he inquired.

"Ah?" said Bellew, settling the tobacco in his pipe with the aid of the salt-spoon, "Proceed, Baxter." "Thirdly, Mr. George, there are those who are content to to merely disappear." "Hum!" said Bellew. "And lastly sir, though it is usually the first, there is dissipation, Mr. George. Drink, sir, the consolation of bottles, and " "Exactly!" nodded Bellew.

Then, afraid perhaps of bringing about bad luck by spilling the salt, he gave up the idea and stole softly away, unnoticed by his betters, who seemed ridiculously occupied with a thin, rustling sheet of paper. But to this day Mrs. Barbara has never found the salt-spoon, a little silver oar, belonging to that Norse salt-cellar, and she never will, that's certain.

"For really, old fellow, I think you ah I think you appreciate yourself as much as I do." "I wonder what it costs to run a flat?" said the Idiot, stirring his coffee with the salt-spoon a proceeding which seemed to indicate that he was thinking of something else. "Don't you keep an expense account?" asked the Bibliomaniac, slyly. "Hee-hee!" laughed Mrs. Pedagog.

Stir them together, and add a salt-spoon of salt. Then mix in as much sifted Indian meal as will make a stiff dough. Flour your hands; divide the dough into equal portions, and make it into balls about the size of a goose egg. Flatten each with the rolling-pin, tie them in cloths, and put them into a pot of boiling water. They will boil in a short time.

Instead of potatoes, you may put in the bottom of the pan what is called a Yorkshire pudding, to be baked under the meat. To make this pudding, stir gradually four table-spoonfuls of flour into a pint of milk, adding a salt-spoon of salt. Beat three eggs very light, and mix them gradually with the milk and flour. See that the batter is not lumpy.

A certain class of girls was learning to make French cream candy, and the recipe for the same, namely, 1 cup of sugar, 1/3 cup of water, 1 salt-spoon of cream of tartar. was placed on the board for them to follow.

Having beaten three eggs very light, stir them into a quart of cream alternately with a quart of sifted flour; and add one wine glass of strong yeast, and a salt-spoon of salt. Cover the batter, and set it near the fire to rise. When it is quite light, stir in a large table-spoonful of butter that has been warmed by the fire.

Tredgold played with a salt-spoon and frowned thoughtfully. "We've been looking round for a ship this morning," he said, slowly. "As passengers?" inquired the captain, staring. "As owners," put in Mr. Chalk. Captain Brisket, greatly interested, drew first his glass and then his chair a yard nearer. "Do you mean that you want to buy one?" he inquired.