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That is a woman's duty." The woman who gave this advice was not naturally inhuman nor heartless: she had simply been trained in the school of obedience. The Jesuit doctrine, that a priest should be as a corpse, perinde ac cadaver, in the hands of a superior priest, is not worse. Woman has no right to delegate, nor man to assume, a responsibility so awful.

Gratia properly refers more to the present, ambitio to the future. Cf. Ann. 6, 46: Tiberio non perinde gratia praesentium, quam in posteros ambitio. Celeberrimus quisque. Such men as Pliny the elder, Claudius Pollio, and Julius Secundus, wrote biographies. Also Rusticus and Senecio. See chap. 2. Plerique. Not most persons, but many, or very many. Cf. Suam ipsi vitam. Autobiography.

"Bowanee makes corpses which rot in the ground. The Society makes corpses which walk about." "Ah, yes! Perinde ac cadaver they were the last words of our great saint, Ignatius de Loyola. But who is this Bowanee?" "Bowanee is to the Society what a child is to a man," replied the Asiatic, with growing excitement. "Glory to the Company glory! Were my father its enemy, I would kill my father.

The doctrine of passive and absolute obedience, the principal tool in the hands of the Jesuits, as summed up in these terrible words of the dying Loyola that every member of the order should be in the hands of his superiors as a dead body 'perinde ad cadaver'.

These two forms are written indiscriminately in the old MSS. The meaning of ne perinde here is not so much, sc. as other seas. Cf. note, G. 5. Ne ventis attolli. Directly the reverse of the truth. Those seas, are in fact, remarkably tempestuous. Quod impellitur.

The modern reader need not be informed, that this is an entire mistake, as to the matter of fact; those seas about Britain are never frozen; though the navigators in this voyage might easily have magnified the perils and hardships of their enterprise, by transferring to these waters what they had heard of those further north. Perinde. Al. proinde.

Nullam venam. "Mines of gold and silver have since been discovered in Germany; the former, indeed, inconsiderable, but the latter valuable." Ky. Ann. 11, 20. Perinde. Not so much as might be expected, or as the Romans, and other civilized nations. So Gronovius, Doed. and most commentators. See Rup. in loc. Others, as Or. and Rit. allow no ellipsis, and render: not much.

Holding self-degradation to be a virtue, and independence as a carnal vice; glorying in being slaves themselves, till to become, under the name of holy obedience, 'perinde ac cadaver, was the ideal of a good monk; and accustomed, themselves, to degrading corporal punishment; they did not shrink from inflicting, even on boys and women, tortures as dastardly as indecent.

See Hand's Tursellinus, vol. IV. p. 454. We sometimes use not so much, not so very, not so bad, &c., for not very, not much, and not bad. Still the form of expression strictly implies a comparison. And the same is true of haud perinde, cf. Boet. Lex. Tac. Est videre. Est for licet. Graece et poetice. Not so used in the earlier Latin prose. See Z. 227.

"Bowanee makes corpses which rot in the ground. The Society makes corpses which walk about." "Ah, yes! Perinde ac cadaver they were the last words of our great saint, Ignatius de Loyola. But who is this Bowanee?" "Bowanee is to the Society what a child is to a man," replied the Asiatic, with growing excitement. "Glory to the Company glory! Were my father its enemy, I would kill my father.