"A rhinoster, is it?" said Von Bloom, knowing that "chukuroo" was the native name for the rhinoceros, or "rhinoster," as he called it in Dutch. "Ya, baas," replied Swartboy; "and one o' da big karles da `kobaoba, da long-horn white rhinoster." What Swartboy meant by this was that the animal in question was a large species of rhinoceros, known among the natives as the "kobaoba."

All the thinking in the world won't make one more blade of grass grow; put one extra pound on the ribs of a long-horn; and in a word, thinking is the bunk, pure and simple!" At this point Swinnerton Loughburne staggered to the window, threw it open, and leaned out into the cold night.

Drawing the water up into his trunk, he raised it on high, and pointing it backwards, he discharged large volumes over his body, and upon the spot where he had received the thrust of the kobaoba's horn. He then ran out of the lake, and charged about in search of the rhinoceros; but long-horn was no longer to be found!

"A rhinoster, is it?" said Von Bloom, knowing that "chuckuroo" was the native name for the rhinoceros, or "rhinoster," as he called it in Dutch. "Ya, baas," replied Swartboy; "and one o' da big karles da, 'kobaoba, da long-horn white rhinoster." What Swartboy meant by this was that the animal in question was a large species of rhinoceros, known among the natives as the "kobaoba."

"Dealing ponies then?" asked Pete. "Anything, sir; anything. Buying for farmers up Lonan way," said Black Tom. "Come on," said Pete; "here's Cæsar with a long-horned cow." They found the good man tethering a white, long-horned cow to the wheel of the tipped-up gig. "How do, Cæsar? And how much for the long-horn?" said Black Tom. Quilliam. Examine her for yourself," said Cæsar.

"Things flew till we came to the ring. There was a hitch. We had plumb forgotten that important article. For a minute I felt stingy; then I cussed myself for a mean old long-horn, and dived into my box. "'Here, take this! I says. 'It was my mother's! "'Oh, Red! You mustn't part with that! cried Loys, her eyes filling up. "'Don't waste time talking; I put through what I tackle.

Robert has to shoot off something he thinks is humorous. "When you all get to Nebo," says he, "perhaps the old mountain will be a little less lonely." "And if anybody offers to give you a steer down there," says I, "don't refuse. It might be just tin-horn advice, but then again he might mean a long-horn beef." As usual Henry is the only gloom in the party. He shakes his head.

They went up in the air, like a long-horn foolin' with the leg-throw for the first time, the other two bumped into them, the fire-faced devil-dragon slipped through, caught me full in the pantry, an' we all avalanched into the celler in one mixed up tangle. I can't describe it to you.

Drawing the water up into his trunk, he raised it on high, and pointing it backwards, he discharged large volumes over his body, and upon the spot where he had received the thrust of the kobaoba's horn. He then ran out of the lake, and charged about in search of the rhinoceros; but long-horn was nowhere to be found!

The steer was a big one, raw-boned, leggy, a typical old-time long-horn of the Texas ranges, and now in fear and rage it put forth all the strength of which it was capable. With his teeth grinding, Wallie fought it in desperation, trying to give the twist that drops the animal. Its breath in his face, the froth from its mouth blinded him, but still he clung while it threw him this and that way.