Sorensen looked at the NAC&M scientist sideways. "You don't sound any happier'n I am, Mr. Thorn." Thorn looked at him and thought he could see that flash of odd humor in his light blue eyes. Thorn exhaled a heavy breath. "I'm no happier than you are to be out in this heat. Let's get on with it." Sorensen's chuckle sounded so out of place that Thorn was almost startled.

These extracts from the diary of Erik Sorensen, District Judge, followed by two written statements by the rector of Aalso, give a complete picture of the terrible events that took place in the parish of Veilbye during Judge Sorensen's first year of office.

These extracts from the diary of Erik Sorensen, District Judge, followed by two written statements by the rector of Aalsö, give a complete picture of the terrible events that took place in the parish of Veilbye during Judge Sorensen's first year of office.

He wouldn't tell us what the power source was. He " Colonel Dower stopped. Then he set his jaw and went on. "Besides, if it were a battery, why didn't he say so? A phony like that shouldn't be " He stopped again, looking at the naval officer. Lacey was still grinning. "We have discovered, Ed," he said in an almost sweet voice, "that Sorensen's battery will run a submarine."

Would you be willing to send Sorensen and others with drawings of everything necessary, loaning them to British Government so that parts can be manufactured over here and assembled in Government factories under Sorensen's guidance?

What you get out of a voltaic cell depends on the composition and strength of the electrolyte, the kind of depolarizer used, the shape of the electrodes, the kind of surface they have, their arrangement and spacing, and a hundred other little things." "I've heard that," Siegel said. Thorn smoked in silence. He had heard Sorensen's arguments before.

Sorensen's Black Suitcase was still a problem to Thorn. He couldn't quite figure out what was in it. "Hotter'n Billy Blue Blazes!" Sorensen said as he put the Black Suitcase down on the gleaming white ground. He grinned a little, which dispelled for a moment his Angry Old Man expression, and said: "You ready to go, Mr. Thorn?" "I'm ready any time you are," Thorn said grumpily.

"Somebody I think it was George Gamow, but I'm not certain once said that just having a theory isn't enough; the theory has to make sense. "Well, Sorensen's theory of hydrogen fusion producing electric current didn't make sense. It was true, but it didn't make sense. "So he came up with a theory that did make sense.

To say nothing of more comfortable." Thorn lit a cigarette in silence. Sorensen nodded and said, "Yes, Mr. Siegel, it would've been." Siegel sat down on one of the camp stools and lit a cigarette. "Mr. Sorensen," he asked in all innocence, "have you got a patent on that battery?" The humorous glint returned to Sorensen's eyes as he said, "Nope. I didn't patent the battery in that suitcase.

As Sorensen said, the contract did not call for the delivery of a specific device, it called for a device that would produce specific results. If Sorensen's device didn't produce those results, or if they couldn't be duplicated by Thorn after having had the device explained to him, then the contract wasn't fulfilled, and the ambitious Mr. Sorensen wouldn't get any million dollars.