"In Persia, where they have splendid horses, all persons of the least distinction ride on horseback, and scarcely any one will deign to go the shortest distance on foot. The anecdote is related by a celebrated pomologist, concerning a horse employed in his nurseries for over fifteen years. His name was Old Charley. I was so much interested in the account of his sagacity, that I went to see him.

They bear their own tops or heads, rather than the heads that a thrifty horticulturist would have put on them. Now and then such a tree produces superior fruit; then a discriminating pomologist discovers it, names it a new variety, and propagates it as other varieties are propagated. Thus have most of the prized varieties originated, without knowledge on the part of man of the ultimate processes.

Every one who has studied cattle-breeding, or turned pigeon-fancier, or "pomologist," must have been struck by the extreme modifiability or plasticity of those kinds of animals and plants which have been subjected to such artificial conditions as are imposed by domestication.

For this purpose the department is separated into thirteen bureaus, under the following officers the Entomologist, Chief of the Bureau of Animal Industry, Chemist, Botanist, Chief of the Section of Vegetable Pathology, Statistician, Ornithologist, Director of the Office of Experiment Stations, Microscopist, Pomologist, Chief of the Forestry Division, Chief of the Seed Division, and Weather Bureau.

She had been Miss Elizabeth Clarke Manning, the daughter of Richard Manning, whose ancestors came to New England about 1680, and sister of Richard and of Robert Manning, a well-known pomologist of the same place. After the death of her husband, this brother Robert came to her assistance, Captain Hathorne having left but little property: he was only thirty-two when he died.

I had a shock when an old friend in a neighbouring village spoke of me as a "pomologist," the title seemed much too distinguished, and personally I have never claimed the right to anything better than the rather pretty old title of "orchardist." The position of an orchard is of the utmost importance; shelter is necessary, but it must be above the ordinary spring frost level of the district.

It is therefore the chief object of the modern pomologist, to obtain from seeds of the best wildings new varieties wherewith to form new and profitable orchards; and which may be expected to continue in health and fertility, as the old sorts have done, for the next century.

The tree becomes a manipulated subject, comforting to the eye of the thrifty pomologist. Branch-pruning is essentially the removal of superfluous branches, those that crowd, that cross each other, that are so placed as to be profitless, that are in the way, that are injured or diseased.

These men, all of whom but one had been born on farms, were O. H. Kelley and W. M. Ireland of the Post Office Department, William Saunders and the Reverend A. B. Grosh of the Agricultural Bureau, the Reverend John Trimble and J. R. Thompson of the Treasury Department, and F. M. McDowell, a pomologist of Wayne, New York.

Every one who has studied cattle-breeding, or turned pigeon-fancier, or "pomologist," must have been struck by the extreme modifiability or plasticity of those kinds of animals and plants which have been subjected to such artificial conditions as are imposed by domestication.