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We robbed Guillamme Coiffier, we robbed the College of Navarre, we robbed the Church of Saint Maturin, I abridge the list of our gambols. Now we harvest. Rene de Montigny's bones swing in the wind yonder at Montfaucon. Colin de Cayeux they broke on the wheel. The rest in effect, I am the only one that justice spared, because I had diverting gifts at rhyming, they said. Pah! if they only knew!

A moderate degree of pomp, such as befitted a person of Montigny's quality, was to be allowed, and a decent tomb erected. A grand mass was also to be celebrated, with a respectable number, "say seven hundred," of lesser masses. As the servants of the defunct were few in number, continued the frugal King, they might be provided each with a suit of mourning.

In view, however, of the peculiar circumstances of the case, it was unanimously agreed that there should be no more blood publicly shed. Most of the councillors were in favor of slow poison. Montigny's meat and drink, they said, should be daily drugged, so that he might die by little and little.

It was not more certain that Montigny's answers to the interrogatories addressed to him had created a triumphant vindication of his course, than that such vindication would be utterly powerless to save his life.

The inquisition the great cause of the revolt The three varieties of the institution The Spanish inquisition described The Episcopal inquisition in the Netherlands The Papal inquisition established in the provinces by Charles V. His instructions to the inquisitors They are renewed by Philip Inquisitor Titelmann Instances of his manner of proceeding Spanish and Netherland inquisitions compared Conduct of Granvelle Faveau and Mallart condemned at Valenciennes "Journee des maubrulea" Severe measures at Valenciennes Attack of the Rhetoric Clubs Upon Granvelle Granvelle's insinuations against Egmont and Simon Renard Timidity of Viglius Universal hatred toward the Cardinal Buffoonery of Brederode and Lumey Courage of Granvelle Philip taxes the Netherlands for the suppression of the Huguenots in France Meeting of the Knights of the Fleece Assembly at the house of Orange Demand upon the estates for supplies Montigny appointed envoy to Spain Open and determined opposition to Granvelle Secret representations by the Cardinal to Philip, concerning Egmont and other Seigniors Line of conduct traced out for the King Montigny's representations in Spain Unsatisfactory result of his mission.

The most interesting features in his character are his generosity toward his absent brother and the manliness with which, as Montigny's representative at Tournay, he chose rather to confront the anger of the government, and to incur the deadly revenge of Philip, than make himself the executioner of the harmless Christians in Tournay.

The most interesting features in his character are his generosity toward his absent brother and the manliness with which, as Montigny's representative at Tournay, he chose rather to confront the anger of the government, and to incur the deadly revenge of Philip, than make himself the executioner of the harmless Christians in Tournay.

At last Montigny's coadjutor made his appearance, and the objects of their embassy were made the subject of repeated deliberations. The king was at that time at his palace at Segovia, where also he assembled his state council. The members were: the Duke of Alva; Don Gomez de Figueroa; the Count of Feria; Don Antonio of Toledo, Grand Commander of St.

A moderate degree of pomp, such as befitted a person of Montigny's quality, was to be allowed, and a decent tomb erected. A grand mass was also to be celebrated, with a respectable number, "say seven hundred," of lesser masses. As the servants of the defunct were few in number, continued the frugal King, they might be provided each with a suit of mourning.

Dumont's Recollections of Mirabeau; Carlyle's French Revolution; Carlyle's article on Mirabeau in his Miscellanies; Von Sybel's French Revolution; Thiers' French Revolution; Mignet's French Revolution; Croker's Essays on the French Revolution; Life of Lafayette; Loustalot's Révolution de Paris; Burke's Reflections on the French Revolution; Carlyle's article on Danton; Mallet du Pau's Considérations sur la Révolution Française; Biographie Universelle; A. Lameth's Histoire de l'Assemblée Constituante; Alison's History of the French Revolution; Lamartine's History of the Girondists; Lacretelle's History of France; Montigny's Mémoires sur Mirabeau; Peuchet's Mémoires sur Mirabeau; Madame de Staël's Considérations sur la Révolution Française; Macaulay's Essay on Dumont's Recollections of Mirabeau.