And as the Christian dormit or quiescit, sleeps or rests in death, so the heathen is described as abreptus, or defunctus, snatched away or departed from life. Again, the contrast between the inscriptions is marked, and in a sadder way, by the difference of the expressions of mourning and grief.

Mechanically he took his Confessio Amantis, and sat down, but never opened it; rose again and took his Shakespere, opened it, but could not read; rose once more, took his Vulgate, and read: 'Quid turbamini, et ploratis? puella non est mortua, sed dormit. He laid that book also down, fell on his knees, and prayed for her who was not dead but sleeping.

'Glis a glisco: quoddam genus murium quod multum dormit. Et dicitur sic quod sompnus facit glires pingues et crescere. Here is another piece of natural history.

Only he faltered in broken German a proposal to pay his respects to the Signora Castellana, to whom he owed so much. "No! Dormit in lecto," said Ebbo, with a sudden inspiration caught from the Latinized sound of some of the Italian words, but colouring desperately as he spoke.

Mechanically he took his Confessio Amantis, and sat down, but never opened it; rose again and took his Shakespere, opened it, but could not read; rose once more, took his Vulgate, and read: 'Quid turbamini, et ploratis? puella non est mortua, sed dormit. He laid that book also down, fell on his knees, and prayed for her who was not dead but sleeping.

Our beloved mother, our little child, our dear brother is with Christ; the parting is only for a time. Yonder, in our beautiful Heavenly Home, we shall meet once more. How different from the words carved over heathen tombs! We know what these were like, for not very far away is a heathen catacomb. 'Valeria dormit in pace. Valeria sleeps in peace. So the Christian woman was laid to rest.

When Lord John declined taking any more, his host exclaimed: 'Do you not know the syllogism, "Qui bene bibit, bene dormit; qui bene dormit, non peccat; qui non peccat, salvatus erit"? At this stage Lord John found it necessary to hire a servant who was capable of acting as guide.

The foolish virgins confess their sins and beg their sisters for help. They sing in Latin, and their three strophes have a melody different from that of the preceding strophes. They terminate, like the others, with a sad and plaintive refrain, of which the words are Provençal: "Dolentas! Chaitivas! trop i avem dormit." In modern French this line reads, "Malheureuses! Chétives!

When standing alone, they seem to mean that the dead rests in the peace of God; sometimes they are preceded by Requiescat, "May he rest in peace"; sometimes there is the affirmation, Dormit in pace, "He sleeps in peace"; sometimes a person is said recessisse in pace, "to have departed in peace."

Vir erat iste magnae staturae et potens in corpore: qui cum partibus suis dormit apud Tirrington iuxta villam sui nominis Tilney in Mershland. Cuius altitudo in salua custodia permanet ibidem vsque in hunc diem.