The vine, however, does not unite with the same facility as the pear and apple, and, to ensure success, must be grafted under ground, which makes the operation a difficult and disagreeable one. It will therefore hardly become a general practice; but, for the purposes above named, is of sufficient importance, to make it desirable that every vineyardist should be able to perform it.

"It shall be done, Supreme. Is there anything further?" "Yes. Make quite sure that none of the inferiors are missing." Shortly afterward the lieutenant reported that one of the huts was empty. "Rolla, the soil-tester, and Cunora, the vineyardist, are gone." "Seek them!" Supreme almost became excited. "They are the lovers of the men we punished!

As this method is mostly followed only by those who propagate the vine for sale in large quantities, and but to a limited extent by the practical vineyardist, I will give only an outline of the most simple manner, and on the cheapest plan. Those wishing further information will do well to consult "The Grape Culturist," by Mr. A. S. FULLER, in which excellent work they will find full instructions.

"It shall be done, Supreme. Is there anything further?" "Yes. Make quite sure that none of the inferiors are missing." Shortly afterward the lieutenant reported that one of the huts was empty. "Rolla, the soil-tester, and Cunora, the vineyardist, are gone." "Seek them!" Supreme almost became excited. "They are the lovers of the men we punished!

Should a seedling, for instance, look very promising in foliage and general appearance, fruit may be obtained from it from one to two seasons sooner by grafting some of the wood on strong stocks, than from the original plant. Hence the vast importance of grafting, even to the practical vineyardist.

It will sometimes be necessary to use these, to cut out old stumps, etc., although, if a vine is well managed, it will seldom be necessary. In this, the vineyardist, of course, only aims at profit, and for that purpose the grapes are often gathered when they are hardly colored long before they are really ripe because the public will generally buy them at a high price.

Moreover, the admirable organization of the Chinese labor is an irresistible convenience to the farmer, vineyardist, and other employer. "How do you arrange to get your Chinese?" I asked a man in the country who was employing more than a hundred in several gangs.

There is no excuse for any one in this country why he should not grow his own grapes, for the use of his family at least, if he has any ground to grow them on. In this, the foundation of all grape-growing, the vineyardist must also look to the condition in which he finds the soil. Should it be free of stones, stumps, and other obstructions, the plough and sub-soil plough will be all-sufficient.

The latter generally are not fit to transplant into the vineyard, but they may be heeled in, and grown in beds another year, when they will often make very good plants. They can thus be safely kept during the winter. I have only given an outline of the most simple and cheapest mode of growing plants from single eyes, such as even the vineyardist may follow.

Of course, close attention and careful watching is the first requisite in all the operations. This is certainly the easiest and most simple method for the vineyardist; can be followed successfully with the majority of varieties, which have moderately soft wood, and even a part of the hard wood varieties will generally grow, if managed carefully.